Tourist Trampled to Death

#31 Aug 19th, 2009, 16:57
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#31
It is very sad about the lady who died.

We who choose to visit wilderness areas are as much to blame for these unfortunate, sometimes fatal incidents.

I remember last year when we were in Periyar and sighted a herd of wild elephants, our guides were very, very worried and cautioned us about making a noise / taking photos etc even though the elephants were more than 100m away. At the time, I thought the guides were over reacting. They were not.

Our taxi driver friend from Coimbatore whose services we always use on our Nilgiris trips, has always told us that the only wild animal to fear even when you are in a vehicle, is the elephant. Again, I thought he was being dramatic. He was not.
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#32 Aug 19th, 2009, 17:07
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#32
I wonder what will happen to those elephants? Will a search be made for them and if found they will be killed on assumption that once they have killed a human, they have turned into killer elephants and will tend to repeat their acts in future? If not found, will all mother-calf pairs in the neighborhood found and destroyed? Or nothing will be done?
#33 Aug 19th, 2009, 18:35
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#33
Quote:
Originally Posted by vegan View Post I wonder what will happen to those elephants? Will a search be made for them and if found they will be killed on assumption that once they have killed a human, they have turned into killer elephants and will tend to repeat their acts in future? If not found, will all mother-calf pairs in the neighborhood found and destroyed? Or nothing will be done?

It is pity if you think elephants should be treated as easy game. Killing of innocent just for sake of using unused ammunition on who so ever it is condemnable. No not a fit case for use of ammunition on innocent simple creatures.
#34 Aug 19th, 2009, 18:38
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#34
Action will only be taken if they interfere with villages. Otherwise, these creatures are being wild, in the wild... and who could identify them, anyway?
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Last edited by nayan; Aug 19th, 2009 at 18:45.. Reason: post edited after deletion of some posts in this thread
#35 Aug 19th, 2009, 20:11
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Originally Posted by cityMONK View Post
It is pity if you think elephants should be treated as easy game. Killing of innocent just for sake of using unused ammunition on who so ever it is condemnable. No not a fit case for use of ammunition on innocent simple creatures.
I never stated that those elephants should be killed. It's just that I have observed in the USA that they generally kill the animals in similar incidents. I was wondering if India follows their example.

I think wild animals were doing what is natural to them and should not be unduly punished for that.
#36 Aug 19th, 2009, 20:47
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#36
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Originally Posted by capt_mahajan View Post Read this in the Hindu today. Sad.

Safety is not a high priority thing in India
I hardly think that's a fair statement in this case. Wild animals in any part of the World, in any country are...wild.
I've been on several rides through the National Parks in India and the guides ALWAYS keep on the side of overcaution.

Saying that safety is not a high priority in India based on just the facts presented here is well, hasty, to put it mildly.
#37 Aug 19th, 2009, 20:57
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#37
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Originally Posted by vegan View Post It's just that I have observed in the USA that they generally kill the animals in similar incidents. I was wondering if India follows their example.
That is incorrect. Even in the US, the assumption that animal acting naturally in its habitat is terminated after a violent encounter with humans is incorrect - at least in the national parks. There have been plenty of incidents involving grizzly bears in the US national parks that are approached differently. There is ample recognition that it is their habitat. Only if it is determined by the park biologists that the animal specifically targets humans is such decision made. Since elephant is a vegan - there is no question of it having developed a taste for the human blood and so even a question of that should not arise. [The closest thing to elephant behavior in the US is found in moose, and more tourists in Alaska are injured by moose than grizzley. However, find me a single incident when a moose is put down in a national park due to human being injured by it.]


My own view I stated in an earlier post differs from the majority here. It was an incredibly tragic and sad incident. It is equally sad that most here are starting with the presumption of guilt about the persons accompanying them, and some to the elephants. Few seem to highlight the (likely) irresponsible conduct on the part of the tourists that (likely) contributed greatly to the incident. I've come across wild elephants and once someone comes too close and does not run away - no amount of guiding, trained advice will help. And, I doubt the guides ran away telling the tourists to stay put. I maintain the most likely explanation is the tourists getting carried away with capturing it on the camera until it was too late. By the way, running away when the wild elephant (or a moose, for that matter) is after you is the right course of action on the part of the helpers - not an evidence of their misconduct.

Tragic but hardly the fault of the help - who were likely ignored in the first place.
#38 Aug 19th, 2009, 21:25
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#38
One of my own family ancestors may his soul rest in peace, during
A shikar party (birds and ducks) setup in jungles near khemkaran, Jammu division had a brush with rowdy elephant. In year 1935 these two members got separated from rest, irked unknowingly an elephant while shooting a bird. who charged at these two at great speed being in prime of their youth these two ran as fast as possible and dodging it climbed a huge tree. Elephant some how had scent of these two reached the base of tree. Tried desperately to shake them down and uproot the tree. Being unsuccessful without wasting more of energy left mysteriously.
After half hour wait these two came down to be suddenly again confronted by same patiently in wait elephant. Now they ran towards the hillock which was very slippery to climb due to recent rain. they some how managed to climb and took refuge in cave and elephant not finding grip to climb due to its massive wait left still in anger. Only next morning these two were found by other party members.
Party never thought to take revenge on elephant or to teach them lesson by killing some of their breed. Happily they came back thanking God for miraculous escape.
#39 Aug 19th, 2009, 22:40
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#39
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Originally Posted by kmalik View Post That is incorrect. Even in the US, the assumption that animal acting naturally in its habitat is terminated after a violent encounter with humans is incorrect - at least in the national parks. There have been plenty of incidents involving grizzly bears in the US national parks that are approached differently. There is ample recognition that it is their habitat. Only if it is determined by the park biologists that the animal specifically targets humans is such decision made. Since elephant is a vegan - there is no question of it having developed a taste for the human blood and so even a question of that should not arise.
Wild animals are very much protected in national parks so killing them does not arise in most cases.However, outside those parks, there does not seem to be much regard for animals' life. A story http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2004/...in592433.shtml mentions that how a mountain lion was killed after attacks on a couple of mountain bikers. "They shot it and killed it. They're testing it to make sure this is actually the cat involved in the attack on the cyclists." It means they didn't even know it was the same mountain lion that attacked the bikers.

When I mentioned 'killer elephants' I didn't mean them developing a taste for human blood. I meant them turning into elephants that enjoyed trampling people just for the fun of it. (I shouldn't be joking though in light of such a tragic event.)
#40 Aug 20th, 2009, 00:57
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#40
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Originally Posted by amitmanikoth View Post I hardly think that's a fair statement in this case. Wild animals in any part of the World, in any country are...wild.
I've been on several rides through the National Parks in India and the guides ALWAYS keep on the side of overcaution.

Saying that safety is not a high priority in India based on just the facts presented here is well, hasty, to put it mildly.
I know I should review the news items before saying this, but ...

1. It may be that the tourists should never have been in that locality, but had been "sold" some sort of trek experience by the resort.

2. It may be that the tourists persuaded the resort.

3. It may be that the guides were not qualified, did not give correct advice, or it may be that the advice was given and ignored.

There are probably a few other may-bes" too, but in a situation where certain parties have expertise, and others do not, then there is a very heavy responsibility on those who have the expertise, even though there may be stupidity on the part of the others.

As I remember it, the resort has been closed, and arrests have been made. Sounds like the authorities feel that the resort/guides were at fault. Is it likely to be an isolated event?

Anyway, I would say that safety is not a high priority in India, based not on these events, but on every-day experience of life here.
#41 Aug 20th, 2009, 01:38
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[QUOTE=Nick-H;796540]I know I should review the news items before saying this, but ...

Unfortunate incident.
Yes no fault of elephants.
Forest has it own rules of wild and are not to be mixed with rules of habitation.
This is not going to be the last incident.
During game season we at our part of world have many such mishaps but are not discussed like this in media.
#42 Aug 20th, 2009, 01:44
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#42
No, an unfortunate incident is certainly not what it is.

It was either gross stupidity on the part of the tourists, or gross negligence on the part of the resort and the guides.

--- or some, yet unknown, perhaps never-to-be known, combination of the two.

Nobody, so far, has even thought of blaming the elephants, so no need to defend them.
#43 Aug 20th, 2009, 01:46
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#43
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Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post Action will only be taken if they interfere with villages. Otherwise, these creatures are being wild, in the wild... and who could identify them, anyway?
You'd have to call in CSI Bombay so they could be identified by the glutinous goo between their toes. But since it was accidental - the elephant would only receive a stern warning.
#44 Aug 20th, 2009, 01:54
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#44

Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post No, an unfortunate incident is certainly not what it is.

It was either gross stupidity on the part of the tourists, or gross negligence on the part of the resort and the guides.

--- or some, yet unknown, perhaps never-to-be known, combination of the two.

Nobody, so far, has even thought of blaming the elephants, so no need to defend them.
why are you so annoyed man.in army days we called any body being killed stupid.she was just unfotunate lady, kindly refrain from
using such word for dead.
#45 Aug 20th, 2009, 02:15
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#45
It is very sad, I feel for her, for her son who was there, and for all her family.

I stand by what I said, but would add that one can be stupid without being knowingly stupid. In such a situation as this, that is what the specialists are there for. Was the guide a qualified, trained guide?
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