Tourist Trampled to Death

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#16 Aug 17th, 2009, 09:23
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#16
I think in this particular case zoos, in which, elephants are presented as mild and obedient creatures whom even children can pet and ride, are partly to be blamed. Always a money-maker for the zoos, along with friendly killer sharks and dancing Bengal tigers. People forget what their true nature is like.
#17 Aug 17th, 2009, 10:39
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#17
I don't know much about the National Parks, but I understand that the guides should be informed and educated; to some extent, naturalists, in fact.

However, there are always those wishing to make a quick buck, and there are always those who think they are qualified to handle situations that they are not. Possibly, if one has grown up in a forest area, it is not so unnatural to think that one has the knowledge to escort visitors, and probably many do, but, probably many do not.

Possibly these people encouraged visitors to leave the car where they should not; they obviously did not (or the tourists didn't listen? That's always possible too) advise about flash photography (damn these stupid cameras where the flash is on by default, even in daylight).

What do we say to the fact that, when danger suddenly became a reality, these guys ran away? leaving an elderly woman to her own devices?

I don't think one can blame zoos! The moats and the fences and the thick glass, to me, serve to emphasise just how dangerous some of those animals are. Seeing the teeth of a tiger just a few feet away is quite enough to make me glad of the glass, however sleepy the animal looks. Of course, whilst I'm not going to be the brightest on the planet, I'm well prepared to admit that there's many more stupid than me.
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#18 Aug 17th, 2009, 10:51
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#18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick-H View Post ... The moats and the fences and the thick glass, to me, serve to emphasise just how dangerous some of those animals are.
Not in case of elephants though in most cases. Mostly they are in open with children allowed to pet them and some even offering rides.
#19 Aug 17th, 2009, 11:02
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#19
That is true. I think most people regard elephants as huge but gentle, and are not at all aware of how dangerous they can be.
#20 Aug 17th, 2009, 11:15
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#20
Elephants, both wild & domesticated, can be extremely unpredicatable & dangerous during the mating season which runs roughly from July to September in India. Your odds of not getting trampled improve a whole lot once they've had their seasonal nooky.
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#21 Aug 17th, 2009, 11:58
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#21
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Originally Posted by PeakXV View Post Elephants, both wild & domesticated, can be extremely unpredicatable & dangerous during the mating season which runs roughly from July to September in India. Your odds of not getting trampled improve a whole lot once they've had their seasonal nooky.
You mean they attacked perverted voyeurs oogling ?
#22 Aug 17th, 2009, 12:18
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#22
The female elephant is in estrus for a very short period and the male elephant is commonly known to be ‘Mast’ in mating season. It is very difficult to control the male in this phase, usually it roams following the smell of female elephant and does not bother whether it is a village etc. Any human contact only makes the matter worse. It is not something that is privileged information. In this case, I am sure both the forest official as well as the tourist must be at fault.
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#23 Aug 17th, 2009, 14:29
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#23
A very tragic story.

The "gentle giants" part is absolutely misleading as wild elephants are exactly that .... wild. The docile elephants in the cities make us unaware of their natural behaviour. A few years ago, in the Madurai temple, there was a really cute calf that would "de-bar" you from exiting the temple till you either purchased and fed it bananas from a vendor sitting conveniently next to it, or put a Rs. 5 coin into its trunk. If you didn't, it would try to poke its trunk into your pocket and give you a very broad hint! As broad as its trunk! The cutest pick-pocket in the world.

As a result people tend to forget that all elephants are not docile. Including me.

In 2005, while returning from Ooty, just 20 mins before Mettupalayam, we came across a herd of elephants crossing the road. The taxi driver screeched to a stop only about 100 m away as a bend in the road prevented us from seeing the elephants till then.

I had never imagined a car could go uphill so fast - in reverse.

Not really realising the situation, I tried to open the door and jump out to take pictures, yelling at the driver to stop. It was only when an elephant charged into the road, faced my direction and trumpeted pretty loudly, that I realised that a calf was stranded on the other side of the road and the traffic was scaring it. By this time the taxi driver had physically hauled me back into the car and doing a swift U turn, put a further half km or so between us and the elephants.

It was only after we saw a few trucks cross from either side did we cross the part again. The elephants had disappeared into the jungle by then.

The driver gave me a continuous lecture all the way to Coimbatore. Fortunately it was in Tamil and so I understood not a word. But the wild eyes,loud rough tone and dirty looks needed no translation.
#24 Aug 18th, 2009, 01:32
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#24

disheartening

My heart goes out to the french tourists who lost their loved one. The tourists should be very careful when dealing with wild animals. one mistake and everything is over.
#25 Aug 18th, 2009, 22:59
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#25
Very sad. A similar incident occurred in Kaziranga a few months back - a Dutch tourist was killed. [http://www.telegraphindia.com/109040...y_10791485.jsp]. It seems that the tourist decided to stay back and photograph the wild animal, although the guide escaped.
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#26 Aug 19th, 2009, 01:18
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#26
There have been regular accidents with elephants over the years, and I understand that some of the displays with captive elephants in India have been restricted in the name of safety. Even "tame" elephants are not always.

Whilst no guide should take their client into trouble, no tourist should ignore the advice of the guide, especially if that advice is to get out of there fast.

Even with a temple elephant, in Kochi, ten years ago, my guide told me to stay well away. It was off-duty at the time, and he told me that, without its handlers there, it could be dangerous to approach.
#27 Aug 19th, 2009, 02:51
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#27

Trampling their own also

Elephants the wise and mighty ones were always part of Indian war machines. Mahabharata tells they participated in war in Kurkshetra.
When Alexander invaded India his soldiers are said to be demoralized by look of such mighty trained creatures (substitute of tanks that time) and it was a big factor in decision to retreat
Back by Greek forces. When Muslim invasions came the Hindu raja always preferred elephants over horses and elephants contributed
in defeat of hindoo rulers.(elephants retreated and trampled there own army) but never the less new Muslim ruler were fascinated by Indian elephants and they became part elite part of their decorated forces now comes invasion of mochas only 15000 in command of Babul and ibrahim Lodi defending Delhi 1 lakh soldiers. There was no match and with Lodiís elephants in front row history repeated itself moment Babur's artillery opened fire
Elephants were aghast with noise turned back and trampled their own army. Babur winning battle of panipat with such a small force.
Now his decedents are fascinated by elephants. Elephants are again
Part of elite Indian forces but were no match to British finally
Again emperor is not able to escape arrest as was moving slow moving elephant instead of horse. Now British employed these trained elephants to move timber e.tc. In jungles and are till date employed as government servants and receive pensions also (Assam.)But they never breaded in captivity capture of wild elephants was a continuous process.
#28 Aug 19th, 2009, 07:12
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#28
According to a TV documentary on National Geographic Channel, three people each week on average get killed by elephants in West Bengal.

Now I'm terrified to go near even "tamed" elephants.
#29 Aug 19th, 2009, 08:27
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#29
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#30 Aug 19th, 2009, 16:28
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#30

Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by kmalik View Post Interesting, but pray tell that has what to do with the thread ?
prayer answered for tell that has what to do with the thread.


trampling by elephants in not uncommon thing irrespective how much you train them.once they start trampling movement every thing gets destroyed on direction of move, are easily startled by noise or flash of light.
Last edited by cityMONK; Aug 19th, 2009 at 17:28..
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