TATR - (Tadoba Andhari Tiger Reserve) - A Trip Report

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#16 May 8th, 2012, 14:13
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  • Duronto Jajabar is offline
#16
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Originally Posted by saugata41 View Post ...
9. The boys who work at most of the hotels are from the local villages and hence they are no professionals. So have some patience and kindly don't be too demanding. They will serve you properly, but you just have to give them some time, they are all some fantastic smiling lads.
..
I shall post the day 1 experiences with photos soon.

I'm with you in this very dealing with the local boys who compelled to serve us while our son has to receive his service...

Nice start up and good information, sougata.

And waiting then....
aamar payer tolai sorshe...(I have wheels under my feet)
#17 May 8th, 2012, 15:01
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#17
Excellent!! Eagerly awaiting the full trip report and photographs with nose glued to my monitor !!

So you say we can go for the safari in our own vehicle? any restrictions or pre-booking to be made for this?
#18 May 8th, 2012, 15:03
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#18
It Seems its raining Tigers in TATR...Awaiting photographs...

Kunal.
#19 May 8th, 2012, 17:38
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#19
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Originally Posted by kunal s View Post It Seems its raining Tigers in TATR...Awaiting photographs...

Kunal.
Yes, it is. The sightings are very good right now & I don't think a single car / gypsy will be returning without a tiger sighting.

As per my knowledge accommodation & safari bookings are full till May 31 st.

Ronak.
#20 May 8th, 2012, 18:24
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#20
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Originally Posted by Duronto Jajabar View Post I'm with you in this very dealing with the local boys who compelled to serve us while our son has to receive his service...

Nice start up and good information, sougata.

And waiting then....
I will fulfill your wish very soon DJ

Quote:
Originally Posted by arunsundar View Post Excellent!! Eagerly awaiting the full trip report and photographs with nose glued to my monitor !!

So you say we can go for the safari in our own vehicle? any restrictions or pre-booking to be made for this?
Yes, you can go with your own vehicle but you have to take a guide. There is a restriction on the total number of vehicles allowed through each gate so pre-booking of the safaris are necessary. And I shall post the photos gradually.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kunal s View Post It Seems its raining Tigers in TATR...Awaiting photographs...

Kunal.
It is.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shahronakm View Post Yes, it is. The sightings are very good right now & I don't think a single car / gypsy will be returning without a tiger sighting.

As per my knowledge accommodation & safari bookings are full till May 31 st.

Ronak.
I would say chances are very very high if you take multiple safaris. There are people who didn't see a tiger after 4 safaris. It is all about being at the right place at the right time.
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#21 May 8th, 2012, 18:47
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#21
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Originally Posted by saugata41 View Post I would say chances are very very high if you take multiple safaris. There are people who didn't see a tiger after 4 safaris. It is all about being at the right place at the right time.
For those who are serious about wildlife I would suggest a minimum of 7 safaris. Since the sightings are very very high 7 safaris would give one a sure shot chance of sighting a tiger. This is applicable to Tadoba at least for this season, don't know what's in store for future. After reading all this one will def. plan a trip to Tadoba but getting an accommodation & booking a safari is a problem right now, much more difficult than sighting a tiger.

Many people have seen 10 different tigers (including cubs) in one safari.

Ronak.
#22 May 9th, 2012, 14:45
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#22
Before I start with my safari log, I wanted to pen down some of our observations about the forest.

Tadoba is a deciduous forest with dense vegetation, in the peak season one can see the yellowish/brownish nature of the forest mostly, with a sheer dryness all over the place, but there are thick green vegetations as well at many places which give shelter to the animals and human alike. The trees also give birth to many fruits, which hang from the trees unnoticed and unspoiled, which is really a rare sight for people like us, confined inside the concrete walls. At places, the visibility is totally blocked by the density of the trees

Thick foliages can be seen everywhere covering the ground. One of the many things that we noticed are the innumerable numbers of bamboo trees spread all over the place inside the jungle, and long grasses, which are long enough at some places to hide even an elephant. The yellow-brown color of these grasses gives a natural camouflage to the predators like the tigers and leopards, it needs an experienced eye to separate a big cat from these grasses. Because of the presence of so many trees, the jungle is comparatively cooler than the aggressive hot atmosphere of outside premises.

One important fact that one must notice is the scarcity of water inside the jungle. A couple of natural and artificial lakes are present inside the jungle – the Tadoba lake and the Teliya lake – but apart from these two there are only a few waterholes around the safari routes inside the jungle. These waterholes are filled up with the water carried on the water tankers for the sake of the animals by the forest department and there are great chances to see animals converging to these places. In fact, the waterholes are the main points where most of the animals can be seen.

There are human presence inside the jungle in the form of tribal villages and forest guards. The villagers also carry out cattle grazing and agriculture inside the forest so it is very common that the cattle fall prey of the predators or the wild herbivores come to the farmlands frequently causing some human-animal conflict at either case.

The safaris will take you inside the jungle first through a tarred road laid from the entrance gates and then there are many small narrow ‘untarred’ diversions which will bring you inside the jungle. The roads are so narrow that only gypsy can venture through the same and the presence of those countless bamboo trees within a touchable distance, blocking the visibility, will bound to give you some uneasiness.

Red, dry and dusty soil can be found all over the place. So if you are behind another gypsy while on these roads, be prepared to digest a couple of kilos of dust and get yourself covered with the red particles. There are elephant safaris too (they don’t track/trap the tigers like Kanha), but the number of elephants are very less – we have only seen 3 elephants at Moharli gate.

Once you enter the jungle, the sounds which you can only hear are the tweeting of the birds – which are abundant – and the constant chirping of the cricket. Apart from these one can also hear the calling of the Sambars/Spotted Deers/Barking deers when a big cat is on the move, but you have to be really experienced enough to identify the same. The falling of the leaves and the hush of the gentle breeze also compose the ‘Sound of the Jungle’. The thrill lies when you are expecting for a tiger to be seen, from those alarm calls, the experience is beyond my writing articulation capability.

The sun will be cruel at the afternoon safaris, so a hat/cap/other protective gear will be must, for you and for your camera – not only to protect from the heat but also from the dust. And carry lots of water with you.

Ample flora and fauna will certainly make you come back with your heart, mind and soul all filled with joy and peace. But please don’t return with anything but memories and please don’t leave anything inside the forest but your footprints (gypsy tyre marks to be precise).
#23 May 9th, 2012, 15:09
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#23
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Originally Posted by saugata41 View Post ..
Tadoba is a deciduous forest ..the yellowish/brownish nature ... a sheer dryness all over ....At places, the visibility is totally blocked by the density of the trees

...

One important fact that one must notice is the scarcity of water inside the jungle. ...the waterholes are the main points where most of the animals can be seen.

.. the presence of those countless bamboo trees within a touchable distance..

Once you enter the jungle, the sounds which you can only hear are the tweeting of the birds ..constant chirping of the cricket.. falling of the leaves .. ‘Sound of the Jungle’...

The sun will be cruel at the afternoon ...


Aha!!!

After our December visit, it's my 2nd visit to Tadoba through your eyes sougata. The bamboo jungle, green thick trees blocking visibility, bird's chirp .... all we felt there ...

But winter Tadoba was no dry and no scarcity of water.. that why animals were also rare to visit their visitors.
#24 May 9th, 2012, 19:31
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#24
After my Bandhavgarh trip in March I am waiting to go to Tadoba. Looking forward to the complete report and images
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#25 May 10th, 2012, 12:12
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#25
Quote:
Originally Posted by saugata41 View Post Before I start with my safari log, I wanted to pen down some of our observations about the forest.

..

Once you enter the jungle, the sounds which you can only hear are the tweeting of the birds – which are abundant – and the constant chirping of the cricket. Apart from these one can also hear the calling of the Sambars/Spotted Deers/Barking deers when a big cat is on the move, but you have to be really experienced enough to identify the same. The falling of the leaves and the hush of the gentle breeze also compose the ‘Sound of the Jungle’. The thrill lies when you are expecting for a tiger to be seen, from those alarm calls, the experience is beyond my writing articulation capability.
..
Oh yes.. those sounds. So many times I have tried to write what they sound like or that strange fragrance of vegetation that envelops you when you enter the forest... but alas.. somethings can only be lived...

Cheers,
Kartik
My Trip Reports: Ranthambhore LRK-GRK Corbett
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#26 May 11th, 2012, 15:31
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#26
Dear All

Me and wifey are planning to travel to tadoba and reach Chandrapur by train .Please help answer the below queiries
1-How to travel from Chandrapur to Tadoba and cost for the same.Any contact would be helpfull
2-How to book MTDC guest house and if not which are the budget accomodation available .My budget is around 1500 per room for 2.
3-How to book the safaris and the cost involved .Any contact would be helpfull

Regards,
Mr Patnayak
#27 May 11th, 2012, 18:26
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#27
Quote:
Originally Posted by patnayak View Post Dear All

Me and wifey are planning to travel to tadoba and reach Chandrapur by train .Please help answer the below queiries
1-How to travel from Chandrapur to Tadoba and cost for the same.Any contact would be helpfull
2-How to book MTDC guest house and if not which are the budget accomodation available .My budget is around 1500 per room for 2.
3-How to book the safaris and the cost involved .Any contact would be helpfull

Regards,
Mr Patnayak
Please PM me and I shall provide you the necessary information.
#28 May 11th, 2012, 18:42
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#28
I have finished working on the first set of snaps, so Safari logs will start straightaway from tonight!
#29 May 13th, 2012, 22:01
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#29
Day 2 2nd May 2012 - 5.30 am - The First Safari

The next morning we were ready by 5.15 and waited outside the MTDC Canteen with many others for the Gypsy. The driver, a fantastic local young lad, Roshan, picked up on his blue gypsy at 5.30 am and we were on our way to the Moharli gate, just 1 km away from MTDC. Our guide, Mr Bantu, Ravi's younger brother, was waiting for us at the gate with all the paperworks ready, so we embarked on our journey straightaway.


Immediately we took a detour and entered through the narrow path and encountered tiger pugmarks!!


Bantu advised that these were almost 30 mins back when the big cat crossed the road, so we followed to the direction the tiger set out his venture, a thrilling experience that was.


We saw some curious and amazing things on our way, which we could not even dream about in the urban households; the crocodile tree is one amongst many.


Various trees with different shades and shadows provided a cool ambience in the morning.




Our guide pointed out at a distance, a bunch of beehives hanging from a tree.


Suddenly through the bushes, we spotted a silhouette of a bison (Indian Gaur).


A monkey sat with her baby, the motherhood seemed universally similar among all the living beings on the earth.


We drove through the jungle hoping for a big cat, but it eluded us so far.


Another amazing wonder of the jungle – a ghost tree, which changes color with the change of season!


The color of the jungle looked as an amazing landscape.


There we saw a ‘Red Wattled Lapwig’ from very close. It was beautiful to look at from a close distance.


We stopped at a place where a waterhole was nearby, where a horde of spotted deer were quenching their thirst.


We moved towards another waterhole where another group were present. They were so peaceful that we did not dare disturb them, just the clicking of the cameras were audible.


Then came a group of sambar deers.


Moving on, another group of spotted deer who were grazing just within 15 feet of our gypsy.


The day became warmer gradually. We set out towards the Tadoba lake, the panoramic lake were too good to see. A cool breeze was certainly needed. The lake was almost full even in the scorching summer with greeneries all around.


Too many birds were also satiating their thirst and hunger at the same time.

A group of cranes (Asian Openbill and an Indian Black Ibis at the background, thanks Naveena) –




A couple of Indian Pond Herons –




A white eyed buzzard, like a person who dipped his feet in the water, with his trousers pulled up –


A deer kid was crossing the road at a distance, perhaps seeking its parents.


Crossing the lake, we also saw a crocodile resting. The lake definitely provides shelters to everyone, in their own ways.


On our way back, we spotted a rare bird, a grey serpent eagle. Bantu and Roshan they were really fabulous and I was surprised how they could spot a bird at a long distance or a tiger pugmarks from a moving car, now that’s experience!


A monkey was too thirsty –


A long shot of an Indian Roller –


A desolate and dilapidated ruin of an ancient temple –


A broken and non-operational machinery –


Returning back at around 9.30 am we saw a group of people enjoying the elephant safaris.


Here a couple of gypsies were waiting for something. We also queued up, expecting a big cat. No one was disappointed for a leopard was there to be seen, but not for long enough to be shot, shot by camera that is. So we captured its gorgeous presence in the camera of our minds till it disappeared like a lightning into the dense jungle. One in one!

Some shots taken by my wife:

Tadoba Lake, a panoramic view:


The road, on our way back:


Amazing colors:


Apologies for the delay in posting but I got busy in some unforeseen emergencies. Hope you have enjoyed the post.
Last edited by saugata41; May 15th, 2012 at 13:33..
#30 May 13th, 2012, 22:21
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#30
Wow!!!

With my poor vocabulary, I'm refraining myself saying more NOW!!!



NICE photos sougata (and shayani), specially loved the beehives, mother monkey (mother's day special!!) and deer kid
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