Corbett and Binsar Safari Report 2012

#1 Jul 24th, 2012, 05:13
Join Date:
Oct 2008
Location:
Preston England
Posts:
571
  • tripsammy is offline
#1
It has kaken a while but here is my latest trip report from our Corbett / Binsar trip in April. This was our second trip to Corbett, we had once again booked our trip with Ramesh Suyal at Tigers in Corbett. The planning was easy as we were able to just give them the dates and they organised everything. We were really excited to be returning. We had decided to visit in April (summer)this time having been in November (winter) last time.

Our flight landed at 7.20 am in Delhi, an hour late! Fortunately we had managed to get some sleep on the flight from the UK. We Our car picked us up as planned from the airport and we set off for Corbett, by car this time, as we wanted to get to Corbett as soon as possible and not wait for the overnight train. Due to the delay arriving we got stuck in long delays getting out of Delhi. The journey was interesting and we watched with interest the changes as we left the city and headed to the more rural areas.





More use of horses than I had noticed on previous visits. The road was straight and pretty good for most of the way. Our driver was pleasant and helpful. We stopped along the way for breakfast, it was clean and busy, we had huge Marsala Dosa ‘s..delicious. Further along the road was getting less smooth, definitely bumpy in places when we hit a deep pot-hole with a loud bang, immediately the car was listing to one side. We continued slowly to the next small town where we pulled into a small garage for running repairs. The driver had the part he need for the suspension in the car and it amazed us how quickly they sorted the problem, two young lads and a wrench!! After 20 minutes we were on our way.

We arrived at the Aranya Resort at 3.30pm, very tired. Ramesh arrived to greet us and explained that he had to rearrange our planned itinerary. We had arrived just before Easter, I had realised this when we booked the dates but I had never thought that it would be a public holiday in India. Ramesh had experienced difficulty in getting our bookings at Dhikala over Easter despite applying for the permits in good time. It seems that some ‘VIP’s had taken priority! Only in India! As a result Ramesh had arranged for us to bring the Binsar trip forward so that he could reorganise the Dhikala and Bijrani safaris. After an evening meal, buffet style, which was good, especially the mutton dish, we headed off to bed.

After breakfast we set off for Binsar, our driver had been a guide at Binsar and is a naturalist so he was able to point things out along the way. This journey was very twisty as we were climbing up into the foothills of the Himalayas.



Parts of the road were quite scary, steep cliffs at the edge of the road with no barrier and lorries coming the other way! Not for nervous passengers! The scenery however was beautiful.
We arrived at Binsar sanctuary and drove up a track as far as we could. We transferred to a Jeep to get up to the resort along a very steep and twisty track requiring a 3 point turn to get round one of the corners.



We checked into our tented accommodation and went for lunch which was simple but very good, Dhal, chapatti, vegetables, a paneer dish, oh! and a bar of cadbury’s chocolate for pudding!



The place is beautiful, rhododendron covered in red flowers and wisteria in full flower, birds, butterflies bees everywhere.



In the afternoon we set off for a walk to ZeroPoint where you can get 180 degree views of the snow capped peaks of the Himalayas.



It was quite a climb and although we are reasonably fit we certainly noticed the effect of the altitude. We saw a grey headed canary flycatcher and some other small birds. As we walked it started to thunder, the birds went quiet, and the cloud came down over the peaks. We watched a Lanageer vulture soaring in the sky fairly close. As we returned to the resort the storm started, and what a storm it was! Torrential rain continued for more than an hour, the temperature dropped and the rain gave way to an ice storm, outside our tent it was a sheet of ice! Sitting in our ‘room’ with the wind whistling through the tent sides we wondered what we had let ourselves in for! The staff were great though, the manager was very responsive, provided large umbrellas and even put hot water bottles in our beds. He told us it had been thundering for several days and that this was the first time it had rained. Good news though as it should clear the cloud for the next day. We talked with Ramesh to discuss plans, he had thought that we wanted to stay a second night at Binsar and so had let our hotel room go but we really wanted to get back to Corbett the next day so we could get into the forest on safari. He assured us he would book us into another hotel. We slept well.

In the morning we were brought chai at 6.30. We looked out to see a clear view of the mountains. We set off for Zero Point, a good walk taking about 40 minutes, yet again we really noticed the altitude. The views were outstanding; it has to be one of the most beautiful places I have been to and was well worth the effort.



We stayed at Zero Point for an hour admiring the views and watching the bird life, Griffon Vulture, Red headed vulture, a crested serpent eagle, pale blue flycatcher, crested tits and a Rufous bellied Niltava, a beautiful bright blue bird with an orange chest…so colourful!



We went back for breakfast, having built up quite an appetite, and tucked into omelettes, paratha and toast…and more of the delicious chai. We spent a lazy morning which was needed after all the travelling, sitting at the viewpoint at the resort, watching raptors soaring above and trying to photograph the numerous butterflies and bees around our room, they seemed very attracted to the flowering wisteria that was growing around our room. Why won’t butterflies ever stay still long enough to capture on camera?





As I walked along the path from the viewing point to the room I turned the corner to find a large langur sitting on the path just in front of me, I am not sure who was the most surprised! He gave me a startled look and leapt up and over the fence and off into the trees where he sat glaring at me for some time.





After lunch we departed for Corbett. On the way our driver/guide pointed out loads of interesting birds including a red billed blue magpie. We stopped at Raniket rubbish dump where we saw a Steppe Eagle, an Egyptian Vulture, A Red Headed Vulture and a brown fronted woodpecker.





We had a good journey back and I must say our driver / guide was excellent, both knowledgeable and very helpful.

We arrived back to Corbett and checked in at the Corbett Escape, Ramesh had really struggled to find us a hotel as it was Easter weekend and this was all that was available. This was definitely a low point, I would not recommend this hotel, when we turned the air con unit on it made a nasty noise and chucked out a load of debris and we couldn’t get any hot water. Fortunately as we were trying to get things sorted Ramesh arrived and got things moving, several guys tried to fix the air con, after 5 had tried and failed another arrived with a screwdriver and an alt meter! By this time we had 6 men at the aircon unit, 1 working, 5 watching and discussing it and 3 men debating the hot water situation. With Ramesh and us as well we had 12 in the room! A manager arrived to inform us that contrary to what we had been told before, no hot water till 7am, there was hot water. Apparently the tap marked with the red colour is actually cold, and the blue tap is hot! Eurika hot water! Then the man with the alt meter managed to get the air con working. Things were looking up!
Ramesh told us that he had sorted for us to stay at Bijrani in the Malani rest house, a small 2 bedroom lodge deeper in the forest than the Bijrani forest lodge. As this is not a catered rest house Ramesh will be getting a cook in to provide for us. We will be staying with another English family. From there we would move on to Dhikala, things were looking good. We were to be with Lalit, a popular driver who would pick us up in the morning.
In the morning Lalit collected us at 6.00 as we were keen to get into the forest. It was very busy at Bijrani gate and we had to wait for some time.



Once in the forest we really noticed the difference in the fauna in April, so dry compared to November when it was so green and lush.



We drove around and Lalit pointed out plenty of birds, A Brown Owl, Slate hooded woodpecker, Changeable Hawk Eagle, Oriental Honey Buzzard, Bee eaters. We saw spotted deer, it amazed us how well camouflaged they are in the dry grass, Sambar deer and pretty little Barking deer.





A peacock strutted his stuff in front of us and we watched a pair of elephants enjoying a dust bath.





There we no alarm calls from monkeys or deer to indicate tigers around so we drove round the water holes and streams in the hope of one soaking in the cool water….no luck. We returned to Bijrani forest rest house for lunch as the forest is closed from 11.00 until 3.00. We met the other family that we would be staying with at Milani rest house. At 3.00 we were off again, we watched a beautiful Sambar doe saunter down to the water to drink, so pretty and so nervous.



The parakeets were noisy as always flying in groups between trees. We drove around the forest then set off towards Malani, we were not quite sure what to expect as we had not heard of Malani before. We arrived at around 7pm as it was getting dark.

What a beautiful and secluded place. The rest house was lovely, a good sized room with bathroom, shower , warm water from solar panels, a good sized living area, patio and so completely remote. It was much better than we had expected.





We watched the sun go down and listened to all the sounds of local toads and birds. We did have to share the bathroom with some rather aggressive looking ants who seemed to have an affinity for the toilet, problem quickly solved by flushing them down the drain with a bucket of water before use! The solar powered lighting was not working but there were candles and that actually creates such a lovely atmosphere, we really felt at one with the forest. Ramesh’s guys, 2 drivers, guide and cook prepared the evening meal which was very good and we settled in for the night. We went to sleep to the calling of a Nightjar who seemed to be sitting just outside our window….Fantastic!

Up early with Chai provided we set off at 5.45. It was fabulous to be the only two jeeps in the whole area, we noticed that the animals especially the deer here were more easily startled than in the areas of the park more frequented by jeeps. We saw the tracks of a large male and female tiger from earlier in the morning , they had completed a full circuit of a track we eagerly watched and waited but they had clearly moved deeper into the forest. We set off towards Bijrani as there are fewer tracks around Malani. We stopped and waited at the river bed, we heard a monkey alarm call and excitement mounted. Lalit explained that there is a tigress with a 6 month old cub in the area, that really got me excited. The call was a one off and there were no further signs. We watched a honey buzzard fly across in front of us carrying it’s pre to a branch close to us, a youngster flew in and was fed, a great sight.



We arrived at Bijrani for breakfast as we needed to get more bottles of water to take back to Malani. We had all agreed that we would prefer to have the lunchtime break of 3 hours in the rest house at Malani rather than at Bijrani so we picked up a packed lunch to take back with us. We drove to the viewing tower and watched a group of elephants in the river bed for a while then gradually made our way back to Malani for lunch. We spent a lovely lunch break at Malani sitting on the patio listening and watching, always with that thought that a tiger or elephant could appear at any time. The afternoon safari was spent checking round the water holes to no avail, there were plenty of peacocks calling and we notices the sea of green as new leaves were emerging on many of the trees, such a contrast to the amber of the dried leaves everywhere around. We headed back to Malani for our evening meal and an earlier night, the other family had experienced a really good tiger sighting. Clearly not our lucky day!
Day 3 at Malani, we packed up and set off early heading towards Bijrani. We watched a beautiful serpent eagle sitting in a tree,





Spotted deer at a water hole and then watched a large group of elephants with young of all ages cross the road and make their way along the river bed. Watching the behaviour and protective nature of the adults was great.







Also watching was another tigers in Corbett jeep driven by Hajeev who was our driver last trip. Gloria (Gloryous) was with him, it was good to meet her as we had chatted over IM before our trips and had intended to meet at Dhikala had our plans not changed. We moved off and checked around the water holes before going back for lunch at Bijrani with Gloria. It was good to share experiences, she told us that soon after we left the elephants they had moved the other way as her guide had noticed something in the elephant’s behaviour, they waited a short while and a tiger crossed near them. If only….. Ah well! We were pleased for Gloria though and it had been a good sighting. In the afternoon we spotted a monitor lizard calmly walk so close to us, a first for us.



Then a mongoose was wandering in the rocks. After a while another jeep came quickly along the track passed us, the guide said something to us as he passed, I said to Lalit ‘follow that Jeep ‘ there is only one reason a jeep heads off at speed in the forest…a tiger! Off we went hanging on as we bumped along the tracks. Sure enough we rounded a corner to join several other jeeps, there was a large male tiger lying in the dried up river bed……At last….our first sighting! He was a beauty, lying there so relaxed.









After 15 minutes he slowly lifted his head and he got up, he turned towards us and then walked along the river bed. We moved the jeep along the track and watched him wander further along the river bed, he was in no hurry but moved purposefully, up banks through the dried leaves, then he stopped at a stream for a drink. So close, so powerful!





Other Jeeps had already left to get to the gate in time as it was getting late, we waited as long as we could but had to leave as we were heading out of the forest. Gloria was able to stay longer as she was staying at Bijrani….so lucky! The time had flown and it was an amazing sighting, he had let us watch him for a full hour! We headed at full speed for the exit and only just made it in time.

Ramesh had moved us to stay at the Hideaway, a lovely hotel and the staff were so helpful, we really appreciated a couple of cold beers on our arrival. Ramesh came to see us and we had a long chat, he told us he would be accompanying us to Dhikala and he had arranged for the hotel to give us a packed breakfast so that we could get an early start. We had a beautiful room and enjoyed a good meal.
In the morning we set off for Dhikala, we watched a munkjack deer and a group of wild boar and a woodpecker.





We stopped at Gharail ( a forest lodge) on the way where we had our breakfast…full Indian and English options, just in case! It was lovely sitting in the forest with lovely food and anticipating what we might see. As we moved on we soon stopped as a jeep leaving the forest told us they had seen a tiger cross the road 2 minutes earlier. We waited but he/she showed no signs and we moved on. We stopped at the viewing point over the river to see the crocodiles, such a beautiful scene.





We arrived at Dhikala at 11.00 and checked in, after lunch we had a sleep in the room until 3.00. Chandran (the driver) came to get us and we scurried off as he said there were 2 tigers at the water hole, we were too late….why did we go to sleep?? Grrrr! We drove on to an area where a leopard had been seen, heard some monkey alarm calls and got very excited but they died out quickly and we moved on. We went to the viewing platform and climbed up to get the best view. In the winter this area was so lush, now it was mostly bare grass with the water hole a clear focal point. We watched birds flying in and out, kingfishers and a paradise flycatcher, a beautiful if strange looking bird, white with a long tail that never seems to stay still long enough to photograph. When it flies it looks like a piece of ribbon floating in the breeze.





After a while Ramesh sensed something….we all went very quiet then he whispered ‘tiger, tiger’ and there he was! A large male jumped up and calmly walked across the grass and away. It was great to have seen him from such a vantage point, and not a jeep engine in earshot! So exhilarating! And we were the only ones to see him. As we climbed down the 2 elephants that were on safari tried to find him but he had gone.



After this we drove down towards the lake and watched a huge group of elephants, it was just amazing watching the interaction between them all, the matriarch in charge, juveniles looking after babies. As we watched a group of females with a matriarch, several youngsters and a couple of babies wander across in front of us. As they crossed the track they had not noticed that there was a tortoise on the track. The baby was so close to it when the adult noticed it, with a scurry she attacked the tortoise, kicking it with her hind foot, and amidst a cloud of dust she continued to kick it. As Ramesh said ‘That is one lucky tortoise’ as it popped it’s head out and scuttled away, clearly shaken but alive! The elephants had all turned to see what had caused the commotion and watched it with interest.









We continued to watch as some youngsters played in the water, others had a mud bath, it was such a peaceful scene and was one of my best moments as we were able to observe their natural behaviour so closely.









We headed back to Dhikala for supper and an early night. We had a good room with a lovely view.
The next morning we had an early start and soon immersed ourselves in the wonders of the jungle, Hog deer made an appearance for us, followed by a group of wild boar and a serpent eagle owl.






We watched a very determined woodpecker hammering away at a tree, completely unconcerned at us watching him. We heard monkey alarm calls so headed off in their direction, waiting for some time but no tiger wanted us to see them! It started to rain which was actually lovely, so fresh, but just for 5 minutes. As we drove on we stopped at a small forest lodge to use the toilets. As I entered the ladies I noticed the were several wasps flying around. Then I realised there were wasps flying in and out of the ‘holes’ of the Indian style toilet, clearly a nest down there! Not fancying a stung backside I left …..and used the other toilet around the corner, thank goodness I wasn’t desperate! We moved on and stopped to watch a sambar stag and then a spotted deer stag strut their stuff, a kingfisher fishing and beautiful bee eaters posing for us.





We returned to Dhikala for breakfast as Ramesh had arranged for us to spend the lunch time when the forest is closed at the hide. We continued into the forest and watched and waited, listening all the time to the sounds of the jungle. At 10.45 we went to the hide, at 2 flights of steps it is quite a height and gives a great view over one of the water holes. We were to be there for 4 hours and we were full of eager anticipation. Unfortunately we were joined by a noisy Indian family with 2 children and another couple with a young child. The father of the 2 children knew everything, a tiger would arrive at 11.00, he knew this as it happened yesterday! He told everyone to get inside the hide, not to sit outside yet he kept on talking all the time. Ramesh told us that as the weather was damp and it is cloudy we are unlikely to see a tiger, he was right! We did however enjoy listening and watching the birds including kingfishers and paradise flycatchers, langurs playing in the trees and a range of deer nervously making their way to the water hole for a drink.





At 3pm the jeep returned for us and we headed off to watch the elephants and wild boar at the lake.We watched a very determined pair of Indian Rollers sitting on a pile of elephant dung, however close we came they were not for deserting!



We went back to Dhikala as we were booked on the elephant safari. There were 3 elephants and Ramesh advised us to chose the elephant with the young mahout as he speaks some English and has a good elephant.



An English lady and her son joined us, we loved being back on an elephant and the mahout was optimistic about finding us a tiger. We trecked all around through the undergrowth and just enjoyed the sights and sounds, tigers, however there were none! The jeeps had congregated and guides were convinced there was a tiger lying low in the area, we worked the elephants and the tension increased, would we surprise Mr Stripes? Alas not today! As we returned to Dhikala our mahout was so sad that he had not found us a tiger.

Day 3 at Dhikala started at 5.45, there had been a storm in the night bringing a pleasant freshness to the air. We drove to where Ramesh had heard some alarm calls earlier, near the grassland. We saw fresh tracks crossing into the grass and heard Sambhar alarm calls from the forest, we waited in silence between the forest and the grassland, excitement building. The elephants on safari worked across the grassland looking for the tiger but to no avail. We watched a black redstart pose for us and then moved off to the lake On the way a peacock gave us a lovely display and we saw some small birds.










At the lake we were treated to a fishing display by an Osprey and saw 2 crocodiles basking in the distance. We drove back across the grassland and Ramesh spotted fresh tiger scat…still wet, and no flies yet, so very fresh! We continued slowly but there were no other signs, Ramesh was still convinced that there was a tiger lying up in the grass somewhere.
We returned to the hide by the water hole again for the lunch break. It was busy today with the same 2 Indian families with children, a young German couple and 4 more elderly Americans. The guy from yesterday started getting bossy with people telling them to all go into the hide and not sit out on the balcony, the Americans were not amused as it was so cramped, they went down to sit on the steps in the lower part of the hide. One of the ladies was very angry that their guide had just ‘ abandoned’ them at the hide, especially as Ramesh had stayed with us. Within 10 minutes the whisper came from Ramesh ‘ Tiger Tiger’, everyone rushed to the edge. A beautiful young male came calmly walking across in front of us to the waterhole, he took a long drink and then sauntered off in the other direction into the shrubs, it certainly made the spotted deer who were resting there run! We were buzzing, he was such a beauty and it was a brilliant sighting.











We waited quietly as Ramesh said he will probably come back as long as we are quiet. Ramesh asked us to try to get the Others up into the hide as it was a young male and he will be easily frightened away if he sees us. Reluctantly, and in the American’s case with bad grace they came up into the hide. Most of us were quiet and hopeful of a further sighting. We waited for for 3 hours but there was no sign of him again, we did watch several kingfishers, and a paradise flycatcher diving into the waterhole and spotted deer resting in the shade. It was very hot and anxiety levels increased in the hide. It didn’t help that one of the children ( The son of our bossy friend!) had been sick in the hide and was clearly unwell. ( The parents clearly knew he was unwell as they had brought children’s paracetomol for him, how unfair on the poor child!)
Chandran came back to collect us and as we went down the steps another guide said there is a tiger near, we jumped into the jeep and moved up the track and round the corner where we stopped. Ramesh spotted the tiger on the grass 30 meters away.



He walked across in front of us and went behind some shrubs. He stepped over a fallen log and walked along in a ditch, we could just see the top of his back. Then he vanished. We moved back round the corner, now with 2 other jeeps to see if he would come out. Suddenly a spotted deer came running out from the undergrowth and legged it along the track away from us followed closely by the tiger, it happened so quickly.



Unfortunately our bossy friend yelled at his driver to give chase which he did, blocking our view and distracting the tiger who gave up the chase, so annoying as we would certainly have had the rare opportunity of watching a kill had he not been so stupid. We decided this tiger had had enough disturbance and left, our ‘friend’ continued to try to find him again! Ramesh told us that the tiger we had seen chasing the spotted deer was the one we had been searching for in the morning, he had clearly been lying up in the grassland. It was a different one to the one we saw at the waterhole who was a much younger tiger. We departed Dhikala and set off back to the Hideaway on the way watching birds on the way including a woodpecker just sitting on the rocks. We so enjoyed a couple of chilled beers on our arrival!

Our last day started overcast as we had had rain in the early morning. We met Ramesh at 6.45 am and went for a walk along the river. We were very amused at the varied uses of the river, especially it’s use as a car wash!





We crossed the river and walked to a small Hindu temple / shrine which was busy with worshippers. We started walking back along the road and it started to rain, we were happy to continue, we are well used to rain as we are from the wettest part of England! Ramesh wouldn’t have it though and called for the car to fetch us! We had breakfast at the Hideaway, Marsala Dosa, Mmmmm!! We then had a lazy morning at the Hideaway, we realised it was the first time we had seen it in daylight, usually arriving late and leaving early. We left for Jirna zone at 2.30, at the gate we were joined by a group of 6 jeeps loaded with school children, Ramesh calls them the ‘Jungle Babblers’! We soon understood why!

As we drove through the zone we noticed that Jirna seems to be more lush and green than the other areas with many small birds especially bee eaters. We saw many blue tailed bee eater nests in the side of a river cliff.







Ramesh noticed jungle fowl and peacocks were flying up into the trees and were clearly startled! A sign of a predator? Jungle Cat? Tiger? We waited 15 minutes then jungle fowl walked out towards us, clearly the predator had gone the other way. Shame! Our last chance for 5 sightings again!
We made our way to Ramnagar, on the way a man on a bike pointed into the shrubs, we stopped and a group of elephants were coming our way. We watched them coming towards us and it looked like they would cross the road near us except a car stopped with a man and 2 kids who were hanging out of the windows and making so much noise and shouting that the elephants turned away. Grr!

We were invited to Ramesh’s house for Chai and met his beautiful wife and family. We returned to the hideaway for a shower and dinner and then left for the train station for the train back to Delhi. On the train a young Indian lad, aged 9 or 10 was very keen to chat to us, his English was very good and he asked so many questions. We were quite ready for sleep when we settled down in the 3 tier ac sleeper carriage.

We had a wonderful trip and were pleased that we added Binsar to the itinerary. In future we will definitely avoid Easter, or any other public holiday when planning a trip and plan to visit at a quieter time.
As for when to go, that is a hard one: In November there were less people generally ( except easter weekend!) and the whole forest was so beautiful, lush and green, cooler too. In April it is hot, dusty and busy but still beautiful. Sightings are said to be easier for tigers as they spend more time at the waterholes.

We saw 4 tigers taking our total over the 2 visits to 9. Strangely we have seen 8 adult males and one female. Our challenge for Ramesh for our next trip is definitely females with cubs, sloth bear and leopards...Oh yes and Giant Hornbills! So I guess that means we will definitely be back!
Last edited by nadreg; Jan 25th, 2013 at 06:36.. Reason: Standard Text Format
#2 Jul 24th, 2012, 08:34
Join Date:
Feb 2012
Location:
India
Posts:
1,161
  • Photofreak is offline
#2
Wonderful pictures and excellent trip report.

Please see if pics and text can be re arranged as it does not appear to be reader-friendly (at least on my system).
#3 Jul 24th, 2012, 10:23
Join Date:
Aug 2010
Location:
United States
Posts:
4,418
  • DaisyL is offline
#3
tripsammy, your photos are just so impressive! Absolutely amazing! Thanks for the write up and the photos - I really enjoyed them!
#4 Jul 24th, 2012, 15:48
Join Date:
Dec 2005
Location:
Mumbai, India
Posts:
3,621
  • shahronakm is offline
#4
Lovely photos. Will go through the detailed trip report later today.

Ronak.
#5 Jul 24th, 2012, 18:29
Join Date:
Oct 2008
Location:
Preston England
Posts:
571
  • tripsammy is offline
#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Photofreak View Post Wonderful pictures and excellent trip report.

Please see if pics and text can be re arranged as it does not appear to be reader-friendly (at least on my system).
Thanks Photofreak, The pics and text seem OK on my pc and tablet. I think it varies according to the pc set up but I am not sure, I am not that pc savvy. What is the issue you are having?
#6 Jul 24th, 2012, 21:19
Join Date:
Oct 2008
Location:
Preston England
Posts:
571
  • tripsammy is offline
#6
OK So I think I see the problem now. I use Mozilla Firefox as my internet browser rather than Explorer. I checked it on several PC's and it views fine but I have just used explorer and now I can see the problem. I am not really sure how to sort it but I will try. Any advice welcome from the IT experts out there!
#7 Jul 24th, 2012, 22:06
Join Date:
Mar 2009
Location:
somewhere quiet away from nosey buggers
Posts:
291
  • FUGLY is offline
#7
Very good report
Its excellent Tripsammy, it now displays perfectly on my PC, but it was "user unfriendly" earlier. So whatever you done has worked.

The photos are great, and you've captured the ambience very well.

You have got to feel for that poor tortoise
#8 Jul 25th, 2012, 15:21
Join Date:
May 2010
Location:
Mumbai
Posts:
6
  • tarbuspanda is offline
#8

Thumbs up Amazing report

Simply Superb!

Well, i am visiting Dhikala the last weekend of November with Ramesh The wait has simply become more difficult after this reading.

Quickly, Tripsammy, just help me with the camera lenses that you have used. what telezoom lens (mm specifications) have you used for the close-up shots of the birds? I have a lens upto 300mm. Will that suffice for these kind of clicks?

A question for other local members: How will the Supreme Court's ruling (as of yesterday, read here: http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/ene...cle3678263.ece) of not allowing tourism related activities in the core zones of tiger reserves affect the safaris in Dhikala or Bijrani zones?

Cheers!
#9 Jul 25th, 2012, 15:33
Join Date:
Feb 2005
Location:
=*USA*=
Posts:
3,472
  • Hyderabadi is offline
#9
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarbuspanda View Post ......A question for other local members: How will the Supreme Court's ruling (as of yesterday, read here: http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/ene...cle3678263.ece) of not allowing tourism related activities in the core zones of tiger reserves affect the safaris in Dhikala or Bijrani zones?

Cheers!
Please see the ongoing discussion on this subject in this thread:
http://www.indiamike.com/india/india...es-sc-t172090/
“Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it’s time to pause and reflect.” - Mark Twain
#10 Jul 25th, 2012, 20:25
Join Date:
Mar 2009
Location:
somewhere quiet away from nosey buggers
Posts:
291
  • FUGLY is offline
#10
I dont personally believe there will be any change at Corbett. Just wait to see what, if any, changes will be made.
Corbett already has a core area, and tourists already, do not go there.

The forest rest houses may be another matter, but, they too have been so successful, I doubt they will be affected either, but you never can be too sure, where India is concerned
#11 Jul 25th, 2012, 20:51
Join Date:
Aug 2010
Location:
Pune, Maharashtra, India
Posts:
1,522
  • saugata41 is offline
#11
Loved the narration and the pics - wonderful to say the least.
Wanderlust - My Travel Journals
Leave your footprint as a tiny but precious comment
#12 Jul 26th, 2012, 06:01
Join Date:
Oct 2008
Location:
Preston England
Posts:
571
  • tripsammy is offline
#12
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarbuspanda View Post Simply Superb!

Well, i am visiting Dhikala the last weekend of November with Ramesh The wait has simply become more difficult after this reading.

Quickly, Tripsammy, just help me with the camera lenses that you have used. what telezoom lens (mm specifications) have you used for the close-up shots of the birds? I have a lens upto 300mm. Will that suffice for these kind of clicks?

A question for other local members: How will the Supreme Court's ruling (as of yesterday, read here: http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/ene...cle3678263.ece) of not allowing tourism related activities in the core zones of tiger reserves affect the safaris in Dhikala or Bijrani zones?

Cheers!
Hi there , I am pleased you enjoyed it, I am sure you will have a brilliant trip. We went to Corbett in November 2010, we loved it at that time, the weather is cooler and everything is so green and fresh.
As for the camera, I use a Sony Alpha DSLR A500 with a Sony 70-300g SSM f4.5-5.6 lens. If you have a 300 lens it should be fine. I looked into a 400 or 500 lens but they are so heavy and unmanageable. I do find a beanbag useful as you can use it to stabilise the camera when resting on the jeep!
As for the banning tourism in core zones, Corbett already has a core zone that prohibits all tourism. My guess is that Dhikala and Bijrani areas will probably remain unchanged, the rest houses bring in a good income after all! I certainly hope so anyway!
#13 Jul 27th, 2012, 18:12
Join Date:
May 2010
Location:
Mumbai
Posts:
6
  • tarbuspanda is offline
#13
Thanks so much TripSammy

Quote:
Originally Posted by tripsammy View Post As for the camera, I use a Sony Alpha DSLR A500 with a Sony 70-300g SSM f4.5-5.6 lens. If you have a 300 lens it should be fine. I looked into a 400 or 500 lens but they are so heavy and unmanageable. I do find a beanbag useful as you can use it to stabilise the camera when resting on the jeep!
This is an absolutely wonderful tip. I was planning to carry a tripod. Maybe shall now look at and compare the pros and cons for a beanbag vs. monopod vs. clamp.

Hopeful of the Dhikala zone trip. Speaking with Ramesh tonight to finalise the trip.

Regards
Keep walking!
#14 Jul 27th, 2012, 19:25
Join Date:
Oct 2008
Location:
Preston England
Posts:
571
  • tripsammy is offline
#14
Quote:
Originally Posted by tarbuspanda View Post Thanks so much TripSammy



This is an absolutely wonderful tip. I was planning to carry a tripod. Maybe shall now look at and compare the pros and cons for a beanbag vs. monopod vs. clamp.

Hopeful of the Dhikala zone trip. Speaking with Ramesh tonight to finalise the trip.

Regards
I took a monopod and a beanbag, I used the beanbag all the time (filled with polystyrene beads to keep weight down) It fits easily on the safety bar on the top of the jeep and gives stability. The monopod was a pain in the jeep and just got in the way. Ramesh used it though as he took over my video camera and he used it in the hide / viewing platform. I dont think a tripod would be much use while on safari. It is also worth taking a cover for the camera of some sort to protect from damp in the mornings and dust later in the day!
#15 Jul 29th, 2012, 22:49
Join Date:
May 2010
Location:
Mumbai
Posts:
6
  • tarbuspanda is offline
#15

Waiting for the next Supreme Court hearing on August 22

Update:

The next Supreme Court hearing on the tiger tourism ban is scheduled for August 22, 2012.

All tourist bookings have been put on hold in the rest houses.

Cheers!
Reply

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
Corbett National Park Safari report Jun 7th, 2017 10:36 376 111639 Indian Wildlife and National Parks
Corbett national Park Safari report Nov 1st, 2014 16:32 3 1661 Uttarakhand
Binsar, Naukuchiatal & Corbett Jan 14th, 2012 18:40 16 11293 Uttarakhand
Corbett, Binsar and Naukuchiyatal Jan 12th, 2012 21:39 12 3552 Uttarakhand
pictures from binsar, mukteshwar and corbett Dec 3rd, 2010 21:41 27 4155 Uttarakhand


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2017
Page Load Success