The quirks of Indian English

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#121 Mar 4th, 2005, 01:19
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#121
I've never actually heard this in conversation, but I like the use of "bamboozlement" used in "Life of Pi".
#122 Mar 4th, 2005, 02:21
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#122
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Originally Posted by philthyrotten I've never actually heard this in conversation, but I like the use of "bamboozlement" used in "Life of Pi".
I think it is an example of how the Indians 'make up' words some times, rather than a usage that is common.
#123 Mar 4th, 2005, 02:40
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#123
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Originally Posted by sgeneris I think it is an example of how the Indians 'make up' words some times, rather than a usage that is common.
Nope, sorry , the Random House Unabridged Dictionary lists it as a noun under "bamboozle", for trickery or deceit. Of uncertain origins according to them, 1695-1705.
I was looking to see if the wonderful World Wide Words http://www.worldwidewords.org/ had anything on this but he doesn't; he does have a verb "bangalored" though which might interest people here: http://www.worldwidewords.org/turnsofphrase/tp-ban1.htm : "It refers to people who have been laid off from a multinational because their job has been moved to India—a business practice designed to save money that is arousing passions in some countries, especially Britain and the United States."
#124 Mar 4th, 2005, 06:53
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#124
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Originally Posted by machadinha Nope, sorry , the Random House Unabridged Dictionary lists it as a noun under "bamboozle", for trickery or deceit. Of uncertain origins according to them, 1695-1705.
I was looking to see if the wonderful World Wide Words http://www.worldwidewords.org/ had anything on this but he doesn't; he does have a verb "bangalored" though which might interest people here: http://www.worldwidewords.org/turnsofphrase/tp-ban1.htm : "It refers to people who have been laid off from a multinational because their job has been moved to India—a business practice designed to save money that is arousing passions in some countries, especially Britain and the United States."
No kidding! Thank you for pointing out. I wonder if History-Sheeter has something to do with 'Charge-sheeting' or 'Chargesheeting'. Also, the word becomes 'charsheet' in the vernacular.
#125 Mar 4th, 2005, 16:33
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#125
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Originally Posted by Dr Funkenstein I'm not totally sure. Someone with a criminal record?
This one I learnt from this very thread
#126 Mar 4th, 2005, 17:44
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#126
saloon ( that is where you get a haircut.. )

mofussil bus stand
miles to go....

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#127 Mar 4th, 2005, 19:21
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#127

Talking

‘Rubber’ is what is used to erase pencil sketches

‘Fancy Store’ is where you can buy miscellaneous stationeries.

‘Goodwill’ is the advance money you pay when renting houses or shops.

‘Beauty Palace’ is where you can buy cosmetics.


Cho cheweet
#128 Mar 6th, 2005, 17:18
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#128

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beach ‘Rubber’ is what is used to erase pencil sketches
That one's actually 'Proper' English (if such a thing exists). A rubber is an eraser in Britain, too. It's a common mix-up between American English and ours.

Ask someone for a rubber when you're writing a letter in New York and you're gonna get funny looks.
Out There Somewhere : My Travel Blog.
#129 Mar 13th, 2005, 15:59
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#129

Talking

Here's a fantastic description of a robbery that's quoted in the Rough Guide:
Quote:
The miscreants absconded with the loot in great haste. They repaired immediately to their hideaway, whereupon they divided the iniquitous spoils before vanishing into thin air.
#130 Mar 14th, 2005, 04:21
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#130
One of my friends in India has never left the country, but has such good English that I often do not know the meanings of the words he uses (ie: He accrued fabulous wealth). Then there are the idioms. I find it amazing that he knows not to use the progressive tense (as in "He is having a nice car") but will say things out of the blue like "wait on plzzzzzzz."

However, I've learned that most Indian idioms in English are just direct translations. I am like this only makes perfect sense in Hindi! (main aisa hi hoon).
#131 Mar 14th, 2005, 04:47
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#131
My knee is paining me.
The function has been preponed.
The trains ply between ___ and ___.

Sounds funny to me! although it may be perfectly correct, I don't always use my dictionary.
#132 Mar 14th, 2005, 07:43
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#132
My mum claims that her colleague came into the room and said, "Here and all it is somehow"...the colleague meant that something felt strange and translated it literally from Tamil into English.
Needless to say, this has become my family's favourite thing to say and is trotted out every chance they get.
#133 Mar 14th, 2005, 14:22
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#133
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Originally Posted by Auntyji My mum claims that her colleague came into the room and said, "Here and all it is somehow"...the colleague meant that something felt strange and translated it literally from Tamil into English.
Needless to say, this has become my family's favourite thing to say and is trotted out every chance they get.
I guess, she was trying to say ' In this place/country...' which in Tamil starts of as ' Inda edathila...' or 'Inga ellam'. which got translated as 'here and all'

Inga -'here'
ellam -' all/everything/everywhere'
#134 Mar 14th, 2005, 22:33
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#134
You are right, I think what was said in English was a direct translation of 'inga ellam oru madri" or some similar statement in Tamil...sounded cute because the lady said it in English, "Here and all it is somehow."!
So Digital Drifter, you appear to know some Tamil? I can think of one more literal translation...I've heard people say "head-going business" when they mean "a successful business" (fromTamil "thalai pora karyam").
#135 Mar 14th, 2005, 22:55
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#135
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Originally Posted by Auntyji [...]
So Digital Drifter, you appear to know some Tamil?
[...]
That's quite an u'statement! :-)

Kumbakonam->Tirunelveli->Madurai->Bangalore are the places of my life...so far.

Do I know Tamil? you bet! & when I get steamed up , I write stuf like this!

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