Help! I'm allergic to curry!

#1 Aug 1st, 2003, 12:49
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  • rachelandmike is offline
#1
Hi everyone,

This is crazy I know, but I am off to India for 7 weeks and I'm allergic to curry! Any tips on finding non-curry based Indian dishes or snacks?

Cheers,

Rachel
#2 Aug 1st, 2003, 13:02
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  • steven_ber is offline
#2

Same here

I have the same problem, I have a hot curry and 10 pints of beer and have to go racing to the toilet about 8 hours later..


If you’re serious you need to find out exactly what spice you are allergic to and then try to find out what foods do not contain it.
#3 Aug 1st, 2003, 15:13
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  • Alan D is offline
#3
Hi rachelandmike!

Depends where you are going to be. If you're travelling in the main tourist areas you should be able to find places that serve Western style food - omelettes, pizzas, toast jam butter, yoghurt, even KFC, and a wide variety of fresh fruit. Most Indian dishes are going to have various spices in them and if you don't know what spices you're allergic to it might be better to give them a miss.

I'm a curry fanatic but I've noticed that quite a few foreign tourists aren't and they seem to get by. You should have no problems.
#4 Aug 1st, 2003, 15:49
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#4
I found that a lot of the indian food available in india is much milder and simpler than the stuff found in indian restaurants back in the uk. I only had a couple of dishes in 6 months that resembled curry.
#5 Aug 2nd, 2003, 04:47
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  • Snowy is offline
#5
ashamed to admit that despite years of visiting India I am still no curry adict. However fish cooked in any fashion is great with me and if I get desperate you can always get chinese food ???
Toast and jam is universal but tea and cake is a great way to start the day.
Snowy
#6 Aug 2nd, 2003, 04:53
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#6
..........almost forgot avoid the temptation to eat at the "home from home". Towards the end of a trip went into Agra and surcummed to my girlfriends insdistance on eating at Pizza Hut. Never been so ill as after that meal !!!!!
#7 Aug 2nd, 2003, 12:24
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  • wonderwomanusa is offline
#7
I am not that crazy about most Indian food, but it doesn't stop me from eating it... and I note that I didn't lose any weight on the last visit, so I must have had enough to eat, somehow.

There's often Chinese food, and restaurants (painted blue, I believe) that serve eggs and toast!
The map is not the territory. --Alfred Korzybski
#8 Aug 2nd, 2003, 14:09
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#8
Seems I've hit a nerve amongst curry-lovers! I do love the taste of curry too but unfortunately spicy/flavoursome foods give me hives. I didn't go into the boring details of my allergy before but it seems as if some people have interpreted my query as meaning that I don't enjoy curry. The fact is that I'm allergic to Salicylates which occurs in almost all naturally flavoursome foods. Curry is made of so many herbs and spices that it really tips me over. I should have asked for suggestions on plain or bland foods such as rice products, breads etc. I have to restrict my diet wherever I go so I'm not about to skip the whole India experience for this reason! Thanks for the tips,
Rachel
#9 Aug 2nd, 2003, 22:54
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  • wonderwomanusa is offline
#9
Sorry, but from your message, it was hard to tell what was going on.... as you can see, we each had a question about what "allergic to curry" might mean, on a medical basis.

Have a good visit to India.
#10 Aug 3rd, 2003, 02:37
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  • catmac is offline
#10
You should have no problem finding plain foods. Awesome breads, eggs in all forms (I've had some wonderful omelettes there), and look out for the porridge (made from all kinds of grains, including semolina!)
The latter was much appreciated by the restaurant cat in Udaipur (promptly christened "Octo-pussy")!
I have to agree that India was a great disappointment in the "curry" stakes, maybe I'm just too spoiled living in East London!
#11 Aug 3rd, 2003, 03:45
see yourself in others. then who can you harm?
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  • Inity & Iditation is offline
#11
woah.. i think you guys have been eating at too many touristy places!!! But if you jump from one place mentioned in the Lonely Planet to the next.... than i would not be surprised that you encounterd no good food. mind you when i visit London, i have not been to any better than mediocre Indian restaurants (but does that mean there are no good ones? probably not.. i just don't know the right places)

by the way.. if there are 'banana pancakes' on the menu... thats a good clue its a tourist restaurant!

Indian food is amazing!!! the first problem is that the majority of places, once they see you they will 'water down' the food so it is more bland. even if you say you like it spicy... they will be 'yeah right!' ... this phenomena irritates me to no end!
also the tourist places will give you sugar SEPERATE from chai!! Blasphemy i say!!!!! you can never get the right taste like when the sugar is cooked in with the chai in all the right proportions!

you have to go to a place where they have no idea about 'westerners' and their 'taste perversions!'

the best food in India is and has always been the food made at home! that is why everyone gets those 'tiffin' lunchpails sent to them... no one wants to eat at restaurants (which are frequently staffed by untalented teenage boys you may notice)...

If you want really nice food, go to a place far away from tourists, and that is filled with Indians! it is cheaper and better.

Also some very fancy and expensive restaurants are also fabulous. the lake palace restaurant in Udaipur for example!

but the tourist restaurants are famous for bland food catering to western lack of taste... etc...

but when I lived with a family in Rajasthan.. mild is hardly the word i would use.. it was soooo delicious.. .but so HOT, my head was spinning, and so was the whole room!
#12 Aug 3rd, 2003, 05:07
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  • wonderwomanusa is offline
#12
My Gujarati neighbors had wonderful dinners, and they were quite mild. I guess it depends on whose medical condition is being cared for!

Much as I am going to hate to do it, I'll have to have some of that chai without sugar on the next visit -- but will carry some sort of sweetener to jazz it up. If one's fate is to have sugar problems, there's not a lot of choice... whether it suits YOUR tastes or not.
#13 Aug 3rd, 2003, 08:31
see yourself in others. then who can you harm?
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#13
WW, didn't mean that if someone has diabetes, then it is not a legitimate reason to watch yer sugar intake.

but for the most part i think it is a horde of anorexic/bulemic eating-disordered folks from the west who have made the anti-sugar trend what it is...

best wishes.
#14 Aug 4th, 2003, 02:03
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#14
To get back to the question away from the touristy places you will find that you are forced to eat a lot of bland food like chappatis, white rice, eggs, chips, etc so you won't die of starvation!! when in the smaller places you can also fill up on fruit, bread, cheese, (try local cheese it's mmmm) and biscuits when you can't face another plate of chips!!
Ninety percent of the places you will visit will have some alternative food though, whether it be Chinese, Italian or "western food" You'll be surprised what you can get to eat on a trip through India!! excellent fish, fine pastas, cakes, and many western items in the more touristy places (vegemite, caburys chocolate, pringles the list goes on!!)
I have say I really feel for you, what a bummer to miss out on Indian cuisine!!!
#15 Aug 4th, 2003, 04:02
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#15
Or maybe you like to cook yourself?
I ve done a lot of cooking myself in india,lot s of bar_b_q`s on different beaches,if you stay with a nice family it s not a problem at all to rent some pots,pans and other kitchen utensils...
especially the seafood is so cheap compared to western prizes,
oh i remember all the langoustes,rivercraps,tuna dishes we had...
sometimes you can even rent rooms with a small kitchen ..

doing like this you know for sure what you are eating..
local cooks are quite eager to learn how to prepare some of your home dishes,in exchange learn some indian cooking

these food allergies will become,or are,a big problem in our western society...
as a cook I could tell you millions of storys about these problems..

the son of a friend of mine is 7,and he s allergic for cocoa,all kinds of nuts,honey....
and now how to explain to a young boy that he cannot eat chocolate bars like all of his friends???

there is definitely something wrong with our food,the way we treat animals,how we plant,grow up our food...

I m wondering about genetically manipulated food in India..
I m not sure if has already arrived in India...


enjoy your meal

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