Tourism's impact on Goa


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#1 Jul 16th, 2008, 17:49
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#1
Am planning to compile a book of academic and other essays that focus on the adverse impact of tourism on Goa. If you could point me to any interesting essays, I'd be grateful. FN
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#2 Jul 16th, 2008, 20:19
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#2
The World Bank done a report, although fairly dated now. I'm fairly certain things have changed on all fronts since then.
I'll find the link and post it. There does seem to a be a lack of this kind research and data.
#3 Jul 17th, 2008, 00:25
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I hope the report doesn't lapse into unrealistic nostalgia like so much reporting on the subject, Who do you write for Fred?
#4 Jul 17th, 2008, 00:50
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#5 Jul 17th, 2008, 00:52
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#5

Nostalgia?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post I hope the report doesn't lapse into unrealistic nostalgia like so much reporting on the subject, Who do you write for Fred?
Nostalgia? There have also been a number of academic studies on this subject ... (see below) written by a wide range of authors. While the 'natives' could be charged with being nostalgic, the debate has moved quite far ahead here. Rgds, FN


* "Raghu Trichur: Tourism and Nation-building: (Re)Locating Goa in Postcolonial India" in Metahistory: History questioning History, edited by Charles J. Borges, S.J. & M. N. Pearson, Lisbon: Vega, 2007. This is the Festschrift complied in Honour of Teotonio R. de Souza.

* Patrice Reimens http://tinyurl.com/2dy6rz ("A Day at the Zombie Beach")

* Anthony D'Andrea: 2007 Global Nomads: Techno and New Age as Transnational Countercultures in Ibiza and Goa. Routlege (International Library of Sociology). Book. http://home.uchicago.edu/~afdandre/

* Anthony D'Andrea: 2006 "The Spiritual Economy of Nightclubs and Raves: Osho Sannyasins as Party Promoters in Ibiza and Goa." Culture and Religion. vol. 7, n.1, March, pp.61-75. Article. http://home.uchicago.edu/~afdandre/

* Anthony D'Andrea: 2004 "Global Nomads: Techno and New Age as Transnational Countercultures in Ibiza and Goa." In Graham Saint-John (Ed.). Rave Culture and Religion. London/ New York: Routledge, pp.236-255 . Book-chapter. http://home.uchicago.edu/~afdandre/

See also:

Alvares, C. (Ed.). (2002). Fish Curry and Rice (4th Edition ed.).
Mapusa: Goa Foundation.

Dantas, N. (Ed.). (1999). The Transforming of Goa. Mapusa: The Other
India Press.

*Davidson, J. O. C., & Taylor, J. S. (1996). Child Prostitution and Sex
Tourism: Goa. Bangkok: ECPAT International.

Dayanand, M. S. (2003). Tourism Attraction Development: A Comparative
Study of the Development of Small and Medium Tourism Attractions in Goa
and Portugal. Unpublished PhD Thesis, University of Goa, Goa.

Desai, N. (2004). See the Devil: Tourism related Paedophilia in Goa
(2nd Edition ed.). Mumbai: Vikas Adhyayan Kendra.

*EQUATIONS. (2002). Weighing the GATS on a development scale: The Case
of Tourism in Goa, India. Bangalore: EQUATIONS.

Kazi, S., & Siqueira, A. (2001). Beach Shacks: Conflict Over Tourists
and Resources. Coastin: A Coastal Policy Research Newsletter(5).

McCabe, S., & Stocks, J. (1998). Issues in Social Impacts of Tourism
Research with Reference to the Indian State of Goa. In K. C. Roy & C.
Tisdell (Eds.), Tourism in India and India's Economic Development (pp.
187-200). New York: Nova Science Publishers.

*Menon, A. G. K. (1993). Case Study on the Effects of Tourism on
Culture and the Environment: India - Jaisalmer, Khajuraho and Goa.
Bangkok: UNESCO.

Newman, R. S. (2001). Of Umbrellas, Goddesses and Dreams: Essays on
Goan Culture and Society. Mapusa: Other India Press.

*Noronha, F. (1999). Ten Years Later, Goa Still Uneasy Over the Impact
of Tourism. International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality
Management, 11(2/3), 100-106.

Noronha, L., Siqueira, A., Sreekesh, S., Qureshy, L., & Kazi, S.
(2002). Goa: Tourism, Migrations and Ecosystem Transformations. Ambio,
31(4), 295-302.

*Noronha, L., Lourenço, N., Lobo-Ferreira, J. P., Lleopart, A., Feoli,
E., Sawkar, K., et al. (Eds.). (2003). Coastal Tourism, Environment and
Sustainable Local Development. New Delhi: TERI.

*Noronha, L., Lourenço, N., Lobo-Ferreira, J. P., Lleopart, A., Feoli,
E., Sawkar, K., et al. (2003). Managing coastal tourism: Perspectives
from India and the European Union. In L. Noronha, N. Lourenço, J. P.
Lobo-Ferreira, A. Lleopart, E. Feoli, K. Sawkar & A. G. Chachadi
(Eds.), Coastal Tourism, Environment and Sustainable Local Development
(pp. 419-446). New Delhi: TERI.Pereira, O. G. (2000). Tourism in Goa:
Risks and Opportunities. In C. J. Borges et al. (Ed.), Goa and
Portugal: History and Development (pp. 91-107). New Delhi: Concept
Publishing Company.

*Routledge, P. (2001). `Selling the Rain', Resisting the Sale:
Resistant Identities and the Conflict over Tourism in Goa. Social &
Cultural Geography, 2(2), 221-240.

*Saldanha, A. (2002). Identity, Spatiality and Post-colonial
Resistance: Geographies of the Tourism Critique in Goa. Current Issues
in Tourism, 5(2), 94-111.

*Saldanha, A. (2002). Music Tourism and Factions of Bodies in Goa.
Tourist Studies, 2(1), 43-62.

*Saldanha, A. (2005). Trance and Visibility at Dawn: Racial Dynamics in
Goa's Rave Scene. Social & Cultural Geography, 6(5), 707-721.

*Sawkar, K., Noronha, L., Mascarenhas, A., Chauhan, O. S., & Saeed, S.
(1998). Tourism and the Environment: Case Studies on Goa, India, and
the Maldives. Washington: The International Bank for Reconstruction and
Development/The World Bank.

TECS. (1975). Report on Tourism Development in Goa: Identification of
Potential Centres and Programmes. Bombay: Tata Economic Consultancy
Services.

TECS. (1976). Employment Potentialities of Tourism in Goa, Daman and
Diu. Bombay: Tata Economic Consultancy Services.

TPCO. (1973). Regional Study of Goa: Development of Tourism in Goa.
Panaji: Town and County Planning Organisation, Ministry of Works and
Housing.

*Wilson, D. (1997). Paradoxes of Tourism in Goa. Annals of Tourism
Research, 24(1), 52-75.

WTO. (1994). Tourism Carrying Capacity Study of Goa. In WTO (Ed.),
National and Regional Tourism Planning: Methodologies and Case Studies
(pp. 93-97). New York: Routledge.

Zebregs, H. (1991). The Economic Effects of Tourism in Goa: With a
Micro-Study on Employment in the Hotel Sector.Unpublished manuscript,
Tilburg.
#6 Jul 17th, 2008, 01:00
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Newspapers report in a very nostalgic fashion Fred, that is what I was alluding to.

I'm shocked to be honest, looking at the wealth of material you and others have put out, then looking at the mess that prevailed.

A balance has to be struck, that's for sure but bad mouthing tourists and wishing the whole industry would just implode doesn't seem very logical or realistic.
#7 Jul 17th, 2008, 01:11
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#7

Perspectives... and perspectives

Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post Newspapers report in a very nostalgic fashion Fred, that is what I was alluding to.
While one trend in the debate looks back at the make-believe "good-old-days" nostalgically, even in the newspapers, another trend in reporting points out that, contrary to the mainstream, globalised debate, the 'smokeless industry' indeed adversely affects some people and their livelihoods not in the manner texts gung-ho about the potential of tourism would like us to believe.

Quote:
I'm shocked to be honest, looking at the wealth of material you and others have put out, then looking at the mess that prevailed.
This has been there for some time... maybe not widely noticed. It also got to do with the 'politics' of news and academic research. Some themes get more prominence over others....

Quote:
A balance has to be struck, that's for sure but bad mouthing tourists and wishing the whole industry would just implode doesn't seem very logical or realistic.
Depends whose perspective goes... a number of my Western friends can't envisage a summer without a holiday to a (preferably cheap) Third World destination.

In Goa, they say, the local form of a "holiday" is just a siesta break each afternoon, spread across the year :-) But then, those who can afford it here too are speedily clambering on the gravey-train of globalisation, which, of course, is seductive too! FN
#8 Jul 17th, 2008, 01:17
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Potential potential, marketing speak isn't it.. I'm more concerned that the many many people who's life is financed by tourism have a future and a say in developments.
#9 Jul 17th, 2008, 01:21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post Potential potential, marketing speak isn't it.. I'm more concerned that the many many people who's life is financed by tourism have a future and a say in developments.
The tourist's burden? LOL....
#10 Jul 17th, 2008, 02:00
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Ok I pack up and go home, it's true but many of my friends swopped fishing/Toddy Tapping/Farming for tourism; drive taxis, own restaurantsetc etc. I do have genuine concerns for them.
As I do for the neighbours who missed the boat and rely on an income from some other source. They have to suffer the burden of tourism without making any money from it.
Ruined ground water, polluted rivers, hap hazzard planning, bent officials, spiraling house prices, drugs, a section of youth who see no further than the tourist season, deforestation, dwindling turtle hatches, algae............
That concerns me too.

For me it all conspires to make any sensible approach/debate higly polemic and as we see in modern Goa,a status quo highly lucratibve for all the wrong people.

I also find the loudest voices in Goa on tourism, are seldom those involved at grass roots level, what's your impression Fred??

I'm not a Anti Goan Fred

I'm not sure if the last post was rediculing me or not, forums are strange places, if it was, we'l leave it at that but I'm genuinely interested in what a learned guy like you has to say on the subject.
We are all in need of education somewhere along the line.

When the book is done let me know, though not an avid reader, you seem pretty qualified to write such a book and draw from a long history of such works.

Should be an interesting read for us humble tourist
#11 Jul 17th, 2008, 02:17
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#11
Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post I also find the loudest voices in Goa on tourism, are seldom those involved at grass roots level, what's your impression Fred??
I'm not a Anti Goan Fred
People who have choices will probably be the first to raise issues. It was some elite Indians who raised questions first about British colonialism in India. In Goa too, it was some sections of the 'upper' castes who questioned Portuguese rule the first. Not that the less were any less patriotic!
I don't see myself "pro-Goan" (if there can be such a position... there are, of course, vary many diverse interests involved, both among the tourists and the host societies) either... Just believe in stating what I see about an issue (no matter how the current orthodoxy prefers to see it). FN
#12 Jul 17th, 2008, 02:24
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I think we're talking at cross purposes here Fred the Anti Goan thing was a joke nothing more I was CERTAINLY NOT holding you to some standard.

Your explanation was great of grass roots V media attendants and was partially my thinking too. Everyone should have a say in their state regardless of their live's station. So

Can we talk again in the future? We're going down a strange path here and you need research, not me talking over the top of you.
#13 Jul 17th, 2008, 03:11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dumpy View Post I think we're talking at cross purposes here Fred the Anti Goan thing was a joke nothing more I was CERTAINLY NOT holding you to some standard.

Your explanation was great of grass roots V media attendants and was partially my thinking too. Everyone should have a say in their state regardless of their live's station. So

Can we talk again in the future? We're going down a strange path here and you need research, not me talking over the top of you.
Sure we can. No problem. I think we're just seeing the same issue from two different ends. FN
#14 Jul 17th, 2008, 08:25
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#14
Quote:
Originally Posted by fredericknoronha View Post Sure we can. No problem. I think we're just seeing the same issue from two different ends. FN
I too express a lot of concerns voiced by Dumpy, concerns or not a great deal of Goa loving Brits actually do give care for Goa and its identity and feel strongly about the way tourism is dismanteling(sp) the fabric of local life, but I also believe Goa has a lot of Colonial past self belief that divides it from spiritual India.
Not a bad thing and not condemning race and creed, but traveling a good part of India has shown me a different side to the true meaning of the country and its people ie. taxi Mumbai 60 rps Goa 300+ = Greed
Last edited by Feelthevibe; Jul 17th, 2008 at 08:28.. Reason: added text
#15 Jul 17th, 2008, 09:25
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#15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Feelthevibe View Post ie. taxi Mumbai 60 rps Goa 300+ = Greed
I think you are oversimplifying the situation. I am of Goan origin but born and lived in Mumbai all my life.

The taxi driver charging 60 bucks will make more money in a day than the tourist cab driver in Goa charging Rs 300.

Secondly, tourists get ripped off and over charged everywhere in the world. This applies equally for both non goan indians and FN's.
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