water purification 4 business

#1 May 10th, 2008, 02:11
Join Date:
Oct 2006
Location:
thailand
Posts:
99
  • 8i8 is offline
#1
hi all,
so this friend of mine runs a guest house. it's a lovely place... oh so green and clean. but as usual, his main polluter is the plastic water bottles that he sells to his guests day in day out. so i'm trying to figure out the best way around it.
what are the most economical options for purification? i remember that in leh they have those refilling stations. does anyone have information how THEY do it? or maybe in touristic places like manali/mcleod some companies can deliver those big 20 liter jugs for a fair price? or other ideas?
cheers,
d
#2 May 12th, 2008, 15:27
Join Date:
Oct 2006
Location:
thailand
Posts:
99
  • 8i8 is offline
#2
errrrr.... anybody??!!
should i ask this in a different forum? maybe the health one or something?
thanx
#3 May 12th, 2008, 15:30
Join Date:
Nov 2006
Location:
New Delhi & Himachal Pradesh (Shimla)
Posts:
5,765
  • puchoo is offline
#3
i havent understood too well.... he supplies the residents with water in plastic bottles (for the rooms) or does he SELL it...for people wanting to carry water with them while walking/trekking etc? coz if he is selling then once can hardly expect them to replace it with a 20litre bisleri dispenser...
#4 May 12th, 2008, 15:32
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
60,209
  • Nick-H is offline
#4
Quote:
can deliver those big 20 liter jugs for a fair price? or other ideas?
Yes, 20lt cans cost a lot less per litre, but residents here are well aware of that, and no-one that lives here would buy their water by the small bottle, unless the happen to be caught out without any.

The trouble with tourists is they are taught by the guidebooks etc not to be trusting, and not without some reason. They want to see a new, sealed water bottle.
#5 May 12th, 2008, 15:52
Join Date:
Oct 2006
Location:
thailand
Posts:
99
  • 8i8 is offline
#5
hi
maybe i didn't explain properly: the guy sells the standard water bottles to his guests. i'm trying to encourage him to save his environment. so i'm trying to find a solution for him, ie, a good way to purify water that he can then still sell to his guests for the same price without creating so much litter.
from what i've seen in leh and other places there are many tourists these days who are aware of this and make the effort needed (which is basically just having your own little container to refill into) and seem to trust that the water is safe.
thanx
#6 May 19th, 2008, 22:10
Join Date:
May 2007
Location:
दिल्ली
Posts:
9,492
  • Dilliwala is offline
#6
You might start of by saying where the GH is, makes a difference when advising what system to consider (water quality). An Aquagaurd can handle most situations, but if the water is specially 'hard' like in some hill-stations, then a Reverse Osmosis system might be needed.

Maybe this thread shud be in the 'Health and Wellbeing' sub-forum for better exposure.
#7 May 19th, 2008, 23:05
Join Date:
May 2005
Location:
Western NC USA
Posts:
3,794
  • camelgirl is offline
#7
My first 4 India trips (between 75 & 86) were BEFORE water was available for sale in small bottles and every traveler carried their own "canteen" which they put either boiled water into or used chemicals to purify.

The biggest problem will be to convince modern tourists NOT to go with the easily obtained safe water in plastic bottles.

I myself have only just decided not to use them again and have purchased a Steripen for all future water purifying.

I honestly believe that any guest house owner can educate the people who come through and convince them to use his clean water that comes from either a giant Bisleri bottle or another source to take away in their own bottle. Most everyone still carries some kind of water bottle. I poured the bottled water into my own Nalgene bottle because it was easier to carry.

I've given up buying bottled water at home and I won't do it again in India. I felt awful throwing away all that plastic on our last trip even though I know some of it is recycled.
#8 May 20th, 2008, 00:11
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
60,209
  • Nick-H is offline
#8
Nalgene.

Didn't they just stop making it because it causes something nasty?

I might have got the wrong plastic, but it sounds awfully familiar. Wasn't long ago.

(damn... I knew I should never have cleared out my entire browsing history, of several months)
#9 May 20th, 2008, 01:57
Join Date:
May 2005
Location:
Western NC USA
Posts:
3,794
  • camelgirl is offline
#9
The most popular Nalgene bottles are Polycarbonite and I do believe they just stopped making them. [Just checked their website and they still have the PC 7 BUT they have a new kind that is still PC but made without the chemical BPA--bisphenol-A, called "Tritan"]

I had about 6 in all different sizes!! The studies suggest that they may be most dangerous in baby bottles for obvious reasons that babies are most at risk for absorbing the dangerous chemical--bisphenol-A -- produced by leaching out of the bottles, even in very small amounts.

Though I am personally not worried about it, I did buy 3 new ones from Nalgene that are not PC (7) (recycling code on bottom). I'm ready to travel!

They are not as attractive and probably not as durable, but I don't care. Hope they don't find something else leaches out of this other kind.

They are very inexpensive on their website and free shipping in the USA!
#10 May 20th, 2008, 02:15
Join Date:
Oct 2004
Location:
Chennai, India
Posts:
60,209
  • Nick-H is offline
#10
Glad you checked it out.

Hmm... I guess I remember now, baby bottles was the big scare.
#11 May 20th, 2008, 02:53
Join Date:
Oct 2006
Location:
thailand
Posts:
99
  • 8i8 is offline
#11
hi!!!
thanx for the replies...
the GH is in manali area. personally i drink the tap water there and i think it's great, and of course it's plentiful... but for the average tourist that would not do.
but i really believe that if the service would be there, tourists would use it.
the thing that would worry me about something like Aquaguard would be maintenance. i doubt there'd be much service in manali.
perhaps the big 20 litre containers are the best option after all? can't find much about it on the net, so i guess i'll try to find out more when i get there.....
should i move this to "health and well being"?? how do i go about doing that?!
#12 May 20th, 2008, 03:13
Join Date:
May 2007
Location:
दिल्ली
Posts:
9,492
  • Dilliwala is offline
#12
If the water quality is that good, then the Aquaguard is fine.
It doesn't need much maintenance. Basic maintenance like flushing can be done by anyone, it's very easy. Other than that, the company's agent wud visit twice a year (they always have to be reminded though ) and do other stuff like back-flushing (even that's not difficult to learn but I can't be bothered). When the guarantee is over, it's best to go for an AMC which is reasonably priced and includes the expensive carbon candle and sediment filter (changed once a year). Also covers against any expensive electronic parts that may have to be changed (never happens though). Two regular visits are included (again, they have to be reminded) plus any others that may be required.
I'd be surprised if there's no service agent in Manali by now becos they've spread to many small towns in N. India, but if there's one in Kullu that is good enough. If not, then Mandi - Shimla's a bit far.

EDIT:
Found it - not only do they have a sales franchisee in Kullu (well, not the town but somewhere nearby), they have one in Manali as well:
http://www.eurekaforbes.com/support/...anali&x=12&y=6

What I can't find is a service centre. They have a Customer Response Centre in Shimla, which I hope is just a fancy term for Customer Relations of sorts - if it is their nearest service/repair centre, that's not too great, other than that, as I said, the machines hardly ever go out of order.
Tell your friend to talk to the franchisee, maybe they take care of minor service as well (quite poss outside a big city). If they at least stock the basic stuff like the candles, then I wud go ahead with them.
Last edited by Dilliwala; May 20th, 2008 at 13:35..
#13 May 20th, 2008, 05:27
Join Date:
Mar 2008
Location:
Australia
Posts:
899
  • zoltan is offline
#13
If he has a commercial guest-house and wants a commercial solution, there are electronic operated filter systems available.

My family in Jaisalmer have one (it's got 5 different filters and a pump that pushes the water through). We were all amazed at the cr@p that is filtered out of the water supply. The only downside to these units is that the filters must be replaced at regular intervals (depending on how dirty the water supply is).

The waste water can be used for washing clothes or poured onto the garden.

The operator could advise people to bring their bottles and offer refills for rp5 per litre.

I have seen a similar operation in Dharamsala (Snow Lion hotel) and the tourists who stay there are happy to use the facilities.

Cheers
Zoltan
#14 May 20th, 2008, 13:33
Join Date:
May 2007
Location:
दिल्ली
Posts:
9,492
  • Dilliwala is offline
#14
Aren't all GHs commercial, zoltan? Ok, not private company ones.

That's an RO system you're talking about. Yes, they practically pump out real mineral water. Much more expensive than an Aquaguard though, plus the hassle of the waste water storage. If the Manali water is so good that OP can drink it untreated, then an Aquaguard wud be sufficient.
#15 May 20th, 2008, 13:38
Join Date:
Nov 2006
Location:
New Delhi & Himachal Pradesh (Shimla)
Posts:
5,765
  • puchoo is offline
#15
It is safe enough to have straight from the tap, infact im having a hard time trying to recall when i bough mineral water at all while being in Himachal..


Quote:
Originally Posted by Dilliwala View Post If the Manali water is so good that OP can drink it untreated, then an Aquaguard wud be sufficient.

Similar Threads

Title, Username, & Date Last Post Replies Views Forum
bring a water filter? + info on GSE water purification Nov 26th, 2012 09:29 29 12349 Health and Well Being in India
Water Purification Aug 29th, 2007 08:45 40 5396 Health and Well Being in India
Water purification Apr 30th, 2007 23:23 5 1068 Ladakh & Zanskar
Water Purification Oct 22nd, 2003 03:28 1 1722 Packing Tips for India travel
Water purification May 14th, 2003 09:36 3 2595 Health and Well Being in India


Posting Rules

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Forum Rules»
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.3.2
© IndiaMike.com 2014
Page Load Success