Swachh Bharat (Clean India) Movement

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#1 Oct 2nd, 2014, 11:03
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#1
So, finally India pays attention to something that is an alien concept here, cleanliness.

PM Modi is about to launch the swachh bharat abhiyan or clean india movement.

For this, there can never be enough of , hope the movement sustains and we see an India that is clean, and citizens who are responsible.
If you find my posts confrontationist, please bear, I am an old frustrated guy who has nothing better to do than sit on rocking chair and curse the world whole day
#2 Oct 2nd, 2014, 20:27
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why am I not surprised?

good luck with the #cleanindia campaign.
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#3 Oct 4th, 2014, 13:58
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#3
Yes, have been launched and relaunched several time but could not sustain...

So difficult to change human habit!?
#4 Oct 4th, 2014, 14:36
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#4
No campaign can change old, entrenched mindsets- not in a real and enduring way.

I think it is a reasonable inference to draw that "caste", factoring in its intricate ritualistic mores on purity, as to how it shapes one's own clan identity and that of the "other", not least of how it anneals individualism, serves even if obliquely towards cementing the general mindset of "I don't need to clean up my own mess as that's not my job or business". Lest someone take this the wrong way I should clarify that I don't mean to run down Hinduism at all, but I do find a flaw in the cultural psyche (and everybody emulates the norm), which applies to all Indians/South Asians be they of whatever caste, religion or creed.

I'd said this in another thread: Is there any place dirtier than India?

That said, there is a ray of hope yet. Until as recently as a month ago women pillion riders in Delhi were under no obligation to wear helmets. But since the law made wearing helmets mandatory, imposing a heavy fine for non-compliance, you now see a sizeable chunk of two-wheeler riders falling into line. The same thing happened with seat-belts; everybody complained about the added annoyance at first but now everybody wears them-(at least in Delhi). Campaigns have been known to succeed in getting residents to separate their plastic recyclables from the their other wastes in many localities in Bangalore.

So laws can and do make a difference and at least it's start.

But for there to be a lasting positive difference on how we act folks will have to imbue their kids with a sense of personal responsibility and a general civic sense, and this is still direly lacking. Having recently driven through the breadth of UP and Bihar I got the feeling that for us to cure ourselves of this deep cultural malaise it will take something like a couple of generations of reform.

Squalor and litter is so fundamental to India's make-up that I find it impossibly hard to imagine the place without it. But I sincerely hope I am proven wrong.

If virtually every Indian can so quickly get acculturated to a mobile phone it can't be that hard to learn to clean up your own mess, can it?
#5 Oct 4th, 2014, 20:57
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"Swachh Bharat Abhiyaan" should be approached with a bipartisan spirit of patriotism". Govt is not asking the Govt employees who are responsible to keep the city clean,to show patriotism.
#6 Oct 4th, 2014, 22:51
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#6
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Originally Posted by Prakaant View Post So difficult to change human habit!?
Quote:
Originally Posted by BholeBaba View Post No campaign can change old, entrenched mindsets- not in a real and enduring way.
I am as pessimistic as you are, for so many reasons. Filth creation is our secular religion.

However, the biggest problem has been that among all the things, creating garbage all over is something that our children see day in and day out, and they get habitual of the same practice.

We all know that parents are good for nothing, and there is no education like civic responsibilities, so children are left to learn from what they see. Perhaps, this campaign will try to be more hammering in sending the message, and Modi I think will not let it become just another failed campaign.
#7 Oct 4th, 2014, 23:40
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All parents are good for nothing, and there is no education like civic responsibilities. This is applicable to you too? Jitu Yadav
#8 Oct 4th, 2014, 23:49
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I have probably known about a thousand families closely, from very poor to filthy rich, and not one of the parents took time out to to teach their kid/s about civic sense. So, yes, I can convincingly say all parents are good for nothing in this context, raja2kb.
#9 Oct 5th, 2014, 03:03
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One of my chacha (father's brother) was an engineer who was with TN PWD. He along with a couple of his engineer friends had come to Mumbai to see the dams constructed in catchment area which supplies water to the city. As is the practice mother prepared lunch so that we could eat it by parking at the road side.

We were some where in the Tansa sanctuary during lunch. We had served it in paper plates. Our guests had their lunch and as usual threw it near the end of the road. I took a plastic bag from my mother and collected their plates and put it in the bag. Whatever waste we created was deposited in the bag and when we stopped for filling gas I threw the bag in the dustbin.

A few years later my parents went to the friends place where they still remembered the incident and they started practicing it during their outings.

Even now when we travel by train we carry a few plastic bags with us to collect the waste and then throw it in the dustbin at the station.
#10 Oct 5th, 2014, 10:16
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#10
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Originally Posted by aarosh View Post ...Even now when we travel by train we carry a few plastic bags with us to collect the waste and then throw it in the dustbin at the station.
Kudos.

The sad thing is that that should be routine practice everywhere, and yet it isn't, even here in supposedly squeaky-clean Vermont. On the first Saturday of May we have a Green Up day here, when people volunteer to muster out and clear the roadsides of litter mostly fast-food wrappers, plastic drinks bottles, and beer cans that thoughtless people have thrown out of their cars over the winter. Everything looks nice for the first few weeks, and then the littering starts again.
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#11 Oct 5th, 2014, 15:39
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#11
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Originally Posted by jituyadav View Post I am as pessimistic as you are, for so many reasons. Filth creation is our secular religion.

However, the biggest problem has been that among all the things, creating garbage all over is something that our children see day in and day out, and they get habitual of the same practice.

We all know that parents are good for nothing, and there is no education like civic responsibilities, so children are left to learn from what they see. Perhaps, this campaign will try to be more hammering in sending the message, and Modi I think will not let it become just another failed campaign.
Yes, Jitu. Something is better than nothing for sure.

The problem is so entrenched. I was 17 when I travelled outside India for the first time, on a trip to Europe. It was only when I returned that I could really appreciate the true extent of India's filth. Before, there was no real comparative reference point in my mind. Of course after a week of being home I fell back to "not seeing" the dirt, as I'd been used to and as most of us still are. And that's the thing, most people don't notice it. Chalta Hai to Chalne Do (It works so let it work in the same vein) is the predominant psyche.

Those who live near or sometimes in squalor are, have been, inured to it in a perverse sort of way as are those who live away from all the shit, in their pristine enclaves, the mess neatly hidden away, to their clean surroundings. And so the filth persists.

A typically Indian scene is one of people, noses covered by hankies and dupattas, walking past an overflowing garbage dump amid which cows and crows feast on plastics and in the middle of which one can see garbage-collectors and waste-sifters. Should one ever deign to speak with them they'd plainly tell you that this work is their roti and that they have to do it. They'd also tell you that they're past the point of feeling the stench- the kind of which would induce a bout of retches in any other person.

And so there we have it, a class of waste throwers and another one that collects, with countless shades in between them.

Last year I visited Baidyanath Mandir in Deoghar, Jharkhand. After the darshan I went over to a pandit's house for lunch. A big bhandara (feast) was underway; there were over a 100 people sat in rows on the floor of the roof of his house eating off paper plates. When I was through I asked the guy beside me where the bin was. He pointed to one edge of the roof. I walked over and looked down. Two storeys below was a massive heap of all types of waste-materials. Along the rear wall of the house, the mound rose up virtually to the firstfloor. Cows were fast feasting. The garbage guys hadn't come by for a while, one guy said laughing, least bothered. The front side of the house was spotless.
Last edited by BholeBaba; Oct 5th, 2014 at 18:18.. Reason: typo
#12 Oct 5th, 2014, 16:12
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#12
I just got a SMS from the PM telling me about it. Could it really be from him.
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#13 Oct 5th, 2014, 16:34
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The mrs has got it 4 times in 4 days.
#14 Oct 5th, 2014, 17:43
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#14
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Originally Posted by BholeBaba View Post It was only when I returned that I could really appreciate the true extent of India's filth.
I have zero tolerance for garbage, and so I clean the entire stretch of road in front of my house. Every week, I pick up all the trash which includes chip packets, pouches, etc that people, including school children throw while on a stroll.

Why do they prefer this particular stretch to enjoy a walk, because it is clean, but they do not think twice before throwing all the trash on the same clean place they enjoy.

I have got used to this indifference from childhood, and just do my job of weekly cleaning, and so I cleaned the whole stretch yesterday too.

However, today I found out a whole pile of garbage thrown on the road, liquor bottles, cold drink bottles, milk pouches etc, obviously thrown by some neighbour...my frustration has given way to helplessness that will stay for a day or two at least, so much for clean India movement, a waste of initiative on the idiots
#15 Oct 5th, 2014, 17:47
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#15
This unfortunately is all too similar to what happens here in Greece. We live next to the countryside. People come and chuck their empty cigarette cases (and cigarettes) as well as their empty plastic containers (sweets, cold coffee, etc etc) in the forest. We pick it up and throw it in the garbage. It is a scenic spot. People come again to enjoy the nature, and throw more rubbish around. Then they go home. We are next door to a school for priests. Guess who are the major culprits in chucking around rubbish… yes, the student priests. The kids right now are practising their drumming techniques for a parade later on this month. So you see a stream of paper where they have been on their practice marching.
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