Stamps, Coins and Banknotes

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#1 Jul 2nd, 2013, 19:13
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This is the first post in the new thread I promised while going way off-topic in Sham Marriage. I'll start with a question I posed in www.railforums.co.uk and to which I provided a link in above-mentioned thread.
It went
Quote:
In which year was a coin carrying the effigy of a British monarch minted for the first time in India?

The name of the monarch would suffice as an answer. Hint: it wasn't Queen Victoria.
The first reply was quite off the mark
Quote:
Royal mint are producing Sovs again this year in India to cash in on the Indian wedding market. The last time they did this was for the end of WWI so I will guess at King George V?
To make things a little easier I replied
Quote:
Coins minted in India during Queen Victoria's reign all carried her effigy so I am obviously asking for a predecessor. A further hint: this monarch had a short reign.
This was enough to elicit a correct answer
Quote:
Ok lets go with William IV
And this is how I closed this particular question
Quote:
The reverse has "East India company", "1835" and the value in English and Persian. The obverse has "William IIII King" inscribed on it. At that time the East India Company administered India on behalf of the Mughal Emperor and previous coins had borne the name of the current Emperor. William IV was King of the UK and of Hanover but had no title pertaining to India.

In 1695 the EIC did mint a coin in Bombay that bore the names "William" and "Mary" in Persian script but did not carry any effigy.
Here is an interesting site with details and lots of pictures of East India Company coinage. Those Shah Alam Rupees must have been minted in huge quantities as they are still quite common. Till some decades ago most people in Bihar kept their savings in silver rupees. You saw a lot of Shah Alam rupees and rupees with Queen Victoria on them but never a William IV rupee. These must have always had a numismatic value much above their bullion value.

The standard reference work on pre-independence Indian coinage is
Part 4 Vol.2 covers the period from 1835 to 1947 and was published in 1980.
#2 Jul 2nd, 2013, 20:25
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#2
Welcome, indeed!

This would be a great learning!

I have subscribed to this thread as it is in Chai and Chat Forum!!
#3 Jul 3rd, 2013, 05:13
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Q: Which coins carrying the effigy of a British monarch are still legal tender in India?

As this is not a quiz I shall give the answer. They are the quarter and half rupee coins issued in 1946 and 1947 and the one rupee coin issued in 1947. They can all be found on this page of the site I linked to in my last post. You notice they aren't inscribed "four annas" and "eight annas". This was because decimalization was already on the cards. Coins issued after 1947 opted for a compromise with "four annas" in Hindi along with "¼ rupee".


These remained valid after the introduction of decimal coinage in 1957. Coins with the inscription "25 naye paise" and "50 naye paise" were first minted a few years later (1959 and 1960 respectively) . Of course the "paisa" only lost its "naya" in 1964.

And BTW, in the 1920s there was a plan to introduce a dollar equal to 2½ rupees and divided into 100 cents. Pridmore has the picture of a specimen of this dollar coin which never went into circulation. An anna equal to 2½ cents would have made the transition much simpler than in the period from 1957 to 1962 when an anna equal to 6¼ naye paise remained in circulation.

This was Bollywood's take on the change:
#4 Jul 3rd, 2013, 06:38
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#4
Hi Golghar. I'm glad you started this thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by Golghar View Post Q: Which coins carrying the effigy of a British monarch are still legal tender in India?

As this is not a quiz I shall give the answer. They are the quarter and half rupee coins issued in 1946 and 1947 and the one rupee coin issued in 1947. They can all be found on this page of the site I linked to in my last post. You notice they aren't inscribed "four annas" and "eight annas". This was because decimalization was already on the cards. Coins issued after 1947 opted for a compromise with "four annas" in Hindi along with "¼ rupee".
I have one of these coins, acquired in my change somewhere in India many years ago, and I've been carrying it around in my purse ever since. I'm glad to know it's still legal tender!

It has George VI King Emperor and his head on one side. The other side has a lion (or tiger?), India 1947, 'Quarter Rupee' in English, 'vav(? - straining my eyes a bit here) rupiyah' in Hindi and something in Urdu.

I don't think I could get much for a quarter rupee these days! It can continue to rest in my purse as a lucky charm
#5 Jul 3rd, 2013, 11:25
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#5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golghar View Post Q: Which coins carrying the effigy of a British monarch are still legal tender in India?
...
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliaF View Post I have one of these coins, acquired in my change somewhere in India many years ago, ... I'm glad to know it's still legal tender!
Though it is still legal tender in India, it would be great if you are able to preserve it for few more years. It will become invaluable!

This page may work as an educator on old coins!
#6 Jul 3rd, 2013, 14:29
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#6
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliaF View Post I have one of these coins, acquired in my change somewhere in India many years ago, and I've been carrying it around in my purse ever since. I'm glad to know it's still legal tender!

It has George VI King Emperor and his head on one side. The other side has a lion (or tiger?), India 1947, 'Quarter Rupee' in English, 'vav(? - straining my eyes a bit here) rupiyah' in Hindi and something in Urdu.

I don't think I could get much for a quarter rupee these days! It can continue to rest in my purse as a lucky charm
It says "pav rupaya" in Hindi and Urdu. I don't remember anyone ever using that expression. It was always "char ana" and the coin was called a "chavanni". "Pav" was still in common use as a measure of weight (¼ seer) till metrication finally seeped down to the vegetable markets.
The predator on the coin looks more like a sabre-toothed tiger than anything stalking the forests these days.
As for George VI's title, I posted this question on the railUK forum.
#7 Jul 3rd, 2013, 16:44
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#7
Quote:
Originally Posted by JuliaF View Post Hi Golghar. I'm glad you started this thread



I have one of these coins, acquired in my change somewhere in India many years ago, and I've been carrying it around in my purse ever since. I'm glad to know it's still legal tender!

It has George VI King Emperor and his head on one side. The other side has a lion (or tiger?), India 1947, 'Quarter Rupee' in English, 'vav(? - straining my eyes a bit here) rupiyah' in Hindi and something in Urdu.
Please post a photo of the coin from both sides.
Last edited by aarosh; Jul 3rd, 2013 at 19:05..
#8 Jul 3rd, 2013, 17:24
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#8
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Originally Posted by Govindpuri View Post Please post a photo of the coin from both sides.
Go to post#3. In the third line of the second paragraph there is a link (the words "this page" underlined). The coins are displayed with rising face value as you scroll down the page. This particular coin is the last of the "quarter rupees". You can find both sides of the coin there. The images on the site are blocked so they cannot be copied and pasted here.
#9 Jul 3rd, 2013, 17:59
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#9
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Originally Posted by Golghar View Post The images on the site are blocked so they cannot be copied and pasted here.
If it can be displayed, it can be copied

On topic: The doughnut shaped pice, was in usage up until early 60s. I remember stringing many of them in a rubberband and taking it to school.
#10 Jul 3rd, 2013, 18:33
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#10
doughnut shaped pice is also displayed on the same page.

Here is the referenced Quarter Rupee coin from the site:
Attached Images
Quarter Rupee coin.jpg 
#11 Jul 3rd, 2013, 19:00
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#11
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Originally Posted by nycank View Post If it can be displayed, it can be copied
I can't get an image-URL. I'd have to put in a screen-shot.
Quote:
On topic: The doughnut shaped pice, was in usage up until early 60s. I remember stringing many of them in a rubberband and taking it to school.
The site has much better pictures of the "doughnut". These didn't carry an effigy of George VI but a crown between "PICE" and "INDIA".



The "doughnut" 1 pice (¼ anna) was introduced during the war to save copper. After 1947 a "simply connected" coin was reintroduced but this wasn't pure copper anymore. All these coins were withdrawn from circulation sometime between 1957 and 1962, along with the ½ anna and 2 anna coins. Only the anna remained legal tender till the end of the transitional period. The doughnuts were put to use at Holi. Normally the bhang drink is prepared in a copper vessel. If none was available a "doughnut" was placed in the vessel in which one was stirring the drink.

@all chemistry geeks
Does copper act as a catalyst or does it react chemically with the bhang? (Or is it just superstition?)
#12 Jul 3rd, 2013, 19:10
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#12
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Originally Posted by JuliaF View Post It has George VI King Emperor and his head on one side. The other side has a lion (or tiger?), India 1947, 'Quarter Rupee' in English, 'vav(? - straining my eyes a bit here) rupiyah' in Hindi and something in Urdu.
Julia, is this the one?

Name:  Pav Rupya.JPG
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Source: From the link in post # 3.
#13 Jul 3rd, 2013, 19:24
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#13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golghar View Post I can't get an image-URL. I'd have to put in a screen-shot.


Does copper act as a catalyst or does it react chemically with the bhang? (Or is it just superstition?)
http://www.chiefacoins.com/Database/...Anna_1940B.jpg

I think Singh Saheb and Das babu have done an excellent job answering your question
#14 Jul 3rd, 2013, 20:25
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aarosh has the right one, Prakaant's quarter anna contains too much silver. It was withdrawn in 1946 when the new one with the feline predator on the reverse was introduced. Simlarly, the silver 2 anna pieces were withdrawn in 1918 when the new base metal ones were introduced. At least they were a different size and shape. http://www.chiefacoins.com/Database/...a-George_V.htm

nycank's ¼anna was the last one before the "doughnut" (we called it a "washer" - I doubt if we knew what a "doughnut" was but my Meccano set had washers - see old/new world discussion on the Sham Marriage thread).

So the copper thing wasn't all superstition - or was it? I must confess I can barely follow articles on biochemistry written in German. Those written in English are well beyond my comprehension.
#15 Jul 3rd, 2013, 22:00
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#15
Quote:
Originally Posted by aarosh View Post Julia, is this the one?

Attachment 47703

Source: From the link in post # 3.
That's the one aarosh!

I'm glad I don't have to take a photo of it

Mine isn't in such good condition as the one in the picture - the 'rim' on part of the head side is completely flattened, I guess that's what comes of being in circulation for nearly 50 years. It must have come to me some time in the mid 90's I guess.

So is it a lion or a tiger?
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